Fred's Live Bait and Tackle Northern Minnesota Archived Fishing Reports Fall  2005

"A Northern Minnesota Fishing Tradition"

Home Fishing Reports Bait on Hand Today Braggin'  Board NEW! Duck Reports

Archived Fishing Reports Fall 2005

 October 2005

Fishing Report 10/17/05 - Late Season Fishing Strategies For the Grand Rapids Region - Jeff Sundin

     As always, the time has passed quickly this season and while Im ready for a break in the action, Im sad that we are reaching the end of the 2005 open water season. At this point (in the season) Im confident that if youre reading the fishing report, youre either one of my fishing pals keeping tabs on how were doing or youre a die hard whos looking for one more good trip before you pack it in for the season. Either way, I really appreciate the visitors to the site and I hope that I can add some information that will make it an even better resource in the coming year. Ill be posting another brief report toward the end of this week and then Im going to focus on the family, dogs and hunting for a while. Well pick up the pace again in a few weeks as the ice fishing season draws nearer.    

     Weve had a week of fairly stable weather now and the surface water temperatures are hovering at 53 to 56 degrees depending on which lake you happen to be fishing. Even though the majority of the area lakes have undergone the fall turnover, these are fairly warm surface temps for this time of year and barring any major cold front, there should be adequate time for a recovery period and another stretch of fairly good fall fishing. Its important to remember that turn over doesnt end fishing for the season, it just changes how we need to approach it. Where, when and how you decide to fish will make a lot of difference right now, so dont get discouraged if your "old reliable" spot isnt producing. You might need to make some adjustments or try some new locations.

     Walleyes have become more elusive than they were a couple of weeks ago, but are still fairly active. In fact they are actually biting fairly aggressively when you first find them. The real key is that theyre scattered and can be found in a greater number of locations, but generally in smaller numbers. I think a lot of this has to do with the abundance of bait fish this year. Its been common to see a school of fish on the electronics, catch several of them on the first pass and then see a "breaking up" of the school that results in a shut down in the action. My best approach has been to keep wandering the drop off, even going in to what looks like marginal territory just to keep us in "new water". As we encounter new schools or small groups of fish, we catch what we can and then move on. Avoiding high traffic areas will definitely help!

 

Here's a perfect example of the payoff that comes when we hold out for that last hour of daylight. The post-turnover period that we're experiencing right now seems to be the trigger that starts Walleyes into their "winter" feeding habits. We'll catch some fish during the day, but prime time, low light periods pay big dividends from here on out.

    

     Walleyes currently inhabit the steeper sloped drop off areas that have easy access to deeper water. Depending on the type of lake, key water depths for me have been from 20 to 35 feet on the deeper lakes. On shallower lakes, key depths have been from 10 to 15 feet. The exception has been rock reefs, bars or points during windy conditions. The walleye have tended to move shallower to feed on the rocks whenever theres been a decent wind to get them stirred up. Water depths of 5 to 8 feet are good under these winder conditions.

 

Fishing for lunkers can get to be an addiction. If you're one who's got the temperament to work at it and you don't mind releasing the majority of your fish, this could be for you! Large, lively minnows really help.

     Bait choices are still wide open for Walleye. This week weve caught more than half of our fish on live bait rigs with night crawlers and we were still catching fish on Leeches until I ran out of them on about the 12th of October. Jig and minnow accounts for most of the rest of our Walleye catch except for the larger fish that youve seen pictured during the past couple of weeks. A lot of those fish are being caught with larger minnows fished on live bait rigs. Weve had trouble finding Redtails, so weve been using large Creek Chubb Minnows instead and theyve been working. I think the Redtails would be better, so if you can find them and youre up for the big fish hunt, these would be great to have.

     Finally, post turnover fishing is a lot like ice fishing and there is usually an hour at the end of the day when these fish get more active. Plan your trip to include the evening bite and you will probably catch at least half of the Walleyes in that last hour before sundown.

     Crappies have moved noticeably deeper during the past week. Fishing the drop off edges like we had done for most of the fall has become less productive and its been better to start looking in more open water. These schools of fish are still near the drop off areas, but not necessarily on the edges any more. Try to cover as much water in 25 to 35 feet as possible and watch for evidence of schools of Crappie in the open water. Once located, its a matter of keeping the boat stationary above the school and fishing vertically with a jig and minnow. I have been forced to go with heavier jigs at times to accommodate the deeper water and this is okay if you remember to keep the jigging to a minimum. Control the drop rate by lowering the jig slowly on a tight line and youll catch more Crappies. They have been avoiding baits that are fished too aggressively and favor a slow drop combined with periods of near motionless fishing. Its critical to hold the boat still with your electric trolling motor.

We've had to work hard to stay on top of roaming schools of open water Crappie, but it's still working. Water depths of 25 to 35 feet are typical and hovering with an electric trolling motor is a must.

     Northern Pike are located wherever the best source of food can be found. Weve noticed a lot of Tulibee action on the surface over deep, open water and when I move slowly through these areas, I can mark large fish in the 20 to 30 foot range which I presume are Northern Pike. On the lakes where weve seen these suspended fish, shoreline fishing has been poor for Pike so I believe wed have to get out there with some deep diving crankbaits and lead core line to work these deep fish. We havent had occasion to try it because our focus on Walleye right now, but its worth mentioning for folks who might be interested.

     On some of the other lakes in the area, weve found large numbers of Pike located on steep drop off areas where bait like Shiners and Tulibees have gathered. On these lakes, fishing the shoreline with live bait rigs and large minnows or jig and minnow combinations are producing really well. Most fish are in the small to medium range with an occasional large fish sneaking in to the picture. Its not uncommon to get a 10 pounder mixed in with a bunch of 2 and 3 pound fish.

     Jumbo Perch are targeting schools of baitfish like young of the year Perch, Shiners and other minnows. Best areas to look for the Perch are weeds or weed and rocks mixed on shallow flats. Weve spotted schools of Perch in water as shallow as two feet where theyre roaming the sandy areas in search of minnows that come in on warm, sunny afternoons. On cloudy or windy days these minnows hold in the deeper weeds just outside of these shallow flats and its an outstanding place to look for the perch. Jig and minnow combos are all youll need to catch them.

    

     Good luck with your fishing, Check back for a final update later this week.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright Jeff Sundin 2005

UPNORTH Fishing Report 10-12-2005 Jason Green

Fall Bite Continues To Improve

Autumn, my favorite time of year!  One day on the water, another in the duck blind and maybe a walk through the woods before dark.  For a short window the 1000 Grand Lakes Area has become a Sportsman's Paradise offering just about anything you can imagine. 

For the longest time the fall water temperatures have been holding in the low 60's but last weeks severe weather finally pushed the mercury down to the low 50 degree range.  We had all been hoping for that 1st freeze to stir things up but 10 degrees was a bit drastic.

With the major change in water temperature anglers were put to the test on producing fish but now that our weather has stabilized the bite continues to get better.

Water temperatures dropping are also causing vegetation

to rapidly deplete.  Locating what's left of shoreline vegetation near points and sharp breaks will increase your odds when looking for walleyes.  The past several days a jig and minnow combination has produced best in roughly 6 feet of water.  We have been finding vegetation in roughly 6'-7' of water and also in 10'-12' where it would break to deeper open water.  Depending on the days conditions it has paid off to work both areas.  While transitioning between vegetation depths we have also been picking up a few bonus jumbo perch to round out the day.

                    
                     
 

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com


Fishing Report 10/10/05 The Big Chill Arrives!

Well, thanks to the massive cold front, rain and winter-like weather we enjoyed last week, the 2005 open water fishing season has entered its final phase. Water temperatures have fallen into the middle to lower 50 degree range and what Id call the "peak" pre-turnover fishing action has given way to a slower, but equally interesting cold water period. Its hard to put your finger on the exact moment that the turnover occurs or the precise effect that the turnover has on fish. But each year as the water temps fall below 55 degrees, I notice a definite change in the action and we are forced to make some dramatic changes in our fishing approach if we want to stay in the action. Its important to remember that not all lakes thermocline in the summer and so for several lakes in our area, this cold blast will actually improve the fishing. On many of the other lakes, there is a slow down in the action for a few days. After that, the fish re-group and the action begins to pick up again. For lots of folks the action has slowed down enough to cause them to lose interest. But for the hardcore or die-hard anglers willing to put up with the colder temperatures, there are still some great days ahead!

Walleyes are now a little sluggish during the daylight hours and were doing well to catch a couple of fish each time we locate a new school. After a pass or two, the fish get "spooky" and we have to move on to another new location. The good news is that when you locate a new group, their initial reaction is to bite fairly well, so if you take the "keep on truckin approach", youll still be able to put together a reasonable mess of fish for your evening meal. For us, the action has been decidedly better during the final couple hours of daylight each day. In fact, most of the best action weve had during the past five days or so has been during those last couple hours of daylight. I presume that there would also be some action during the dark of night, but we have been leaving at around 7:30 PM and havent really tried the night bite.

The walleye we are finding have been located on the steeper portions of shoreline structures like points and inside corners. Rocks have been holding some fish too, especially on the windier days. Jig and minnow is our best producer, but were still getting some fish on Night Crawlers. The Night Crawlers have been a great back up plan for working the steeper weed edges when the water is calm. Creeping along slowly by back trolling with an electric trolling motor has been the ticket. Moving too fast seems to be taboo right now, so if youre marking fish that wont bite, slow down and try again.

Jumbo Perch are still hitting fairly aggressively if you can locate a good school. They have gathered on smaller spots though and like the walleye, have responded better to a slower fishing style. They can still be located in and around weed beds where plenty of baitfish are present. Jig and minnow is our best bait and weve experienced better results by using larger than normal size minnows. A fathead, Rainbow or Shiner in the 4-inch range keeps some of the smaller fish from attacking and the better fish have had no problem gobbling up these larger minnows.

The balance of this report is a re-print of the report from 10-5-05 and the information is still valid for the moment. Ill post an additional update mid-week.

Crappies continue to be found out in some of the more open terrain and can be found in small packs. Its been a little unpredictable and sometimes the bite has been sluggish requiring lots of attention to trigger a bite from the fish. More and more now Ive been waiting for the last couple of hours of daylight before going after them and it seems to help. The method for catching them is largely the same as its been during past reports except that we are now searching a little further out from the breaklines and open water, soft bottom areas are becoming more important to us. Look for any sign of a roaming pack of fish, hover over the school and fish vertically with a jig & minnow. These fish have been particularly interested in a slow presentation and at times weve had to stop moving the bait completely before they would bite.

It has become a lot more common to locate Bluegills mixed in the same areas with the Crappies, so now days I have someone fishing with a jig and small piece of cut worm at all times. Its amazing how often the Crappies bite these worms and although the worm wouldnt be my first choice for Crappie, using them wont take you completely out of the action while you search for Bluegills.

Northern Pike are getting pretty cooperative, but not on the larger casting baits or trolling lures. Weve found that the average size of pike were catching by jig & minnow fish is at least equal to the quality were getting on larger baits. They do seem to want meat right now though and Id recommend using either the jig & minnow approach or use a live bait rig with a lively minnow like a Redtail, Creek Chubb or Sucker. Ive had great luck with using a heavy 20-pound test fluorocarbon leader to protect from the bite off problems associated with using live bait for Pike. The patterns for the pike are varied, but anywhere that you find an abundance of food (for them), you will have some action. On a few of the area lakes with good Tulibee populations, were seeing the Pike gather along the steep drop off areas where these fall spawning bait fish are already staging. On the shallower lakes, were finding the Pike in areas where other forage including Walleyes or Perch is abundant.

As the fishing season winds down for many, well still being going strong for another couple of weeks and Ill try to keep you posted on the changing conditions. After that, Im hoping to take a little break and do some hunting.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright Jeff Sundin 2005

Fishing Report 10/5/05 Big Fish Reward Weather Challenged Anglers - Jeff Sundin

     Colder weather, rain and brisk winds have dished out a challenging scenario for anglers in the Grand Rapids, Deer River area this week. In typical fall fashion, most folks who keep their minds focused on the job are being rewarded with some good numbers and really nice size fish. Water temperatures are holding at just around 60 degrees right now and this is what Id call the peak of the pre-turnover period. On most lakes that have a thermocline, the turnover occurs when the surface temperature dips to 55 or so. Just before the turnover is prime time for anglers who want to catch the fish during their heavy feeding period.

Big Minnesota Walleye Double for Eldon Skoglund and Bud Freeman

A dream Double! Two big fish at once sure beats getting snagged on the rocks.

     Walleyes are still scattered, but active. So anyone who wants to do really well should be prepared to cover lots of water to be sure that youre always near some fresh fish. I said cover water, not run around! There are lots of folks running from spot to spot trying to find the largest possible school of fish. This approach has been falling short for many of the gun and run fishermen. A much better approach right now is to make short moves between spots and cover the water on a given shoreline really thoroughly. For the past several days weve noticed that a small school of fish will bite well as soon as we start fishing in new territory, but after the first pass (or maybe two at most) the school breaks up and our action drops way off. By making short moves up the same shoreline (sometimes just by drifting or trolling), weve been able to locate another small group of fish and so on.

     Jig and minnow fishing which is typically my favorite for fall Walleye fishing, has taken a back seat to night crawlers fished on a live bait rig or small jig head. Dont get me wrong, we can and are catching fish on the jig & minnow. But, when I get in trouble, I break out the crawlers and they are consistently putting fish in the boat under tough conditions. Depending on the type of lake youre fishing, there are a couple of patterns going on right now. On the shallower wind swept lakes (like Winnie), fishing the weedline and shallow rocks are producing fish. The deeper lakes (like Pokegama) have a better action bite going in the deeper water. Points and shoreline breaks in water depths of 20 to 40 feet are typical and in some cases these fish could be as deep as 60 feet or even more. Watching the graph like a hawk will help you locate these deep fish, we use exactly the same baits as we do in the shallower water, except we adjust the weight of our sinkers or jigs to make it easier to keep in contact with the bottom.

 

Sunset at Williams Narrows on Cutfoot Sioux offers a chance at evening run Walleye

 

If the going gets tough during the day, try the evening bite. These folks are cashing in on that last light flurry of activity that can easily add another half dozen Walleyes to your daily bag.

     Jumbo Perch are making a splash right now too. Weve found good schools of nice size fish on the weedlines mixed with Walleyes or nearby areas where the Walleye are feeding. The Perch are feeding on huge schools of young of the year Perch that are gathered on the weedlines. Simple but effective as always, the jig & minnow has been the clear ticket.

     Crappies continue to be found out in some of the more open terrain and can be found in small packs. Its been a little unpredictable and sometimes the bite has been sluggish requiring lots of attention to trigger a bite from the fish. More and more now Ive been waiting for the last couple of hours of daylight before going after them and it seems to help. The method for catching them is largely the same as its been during past reports except that we are now searching a little further out from the breaklines and open water, soft bottom areas are becoming more important to us.

     Look for any sign of a roaming pack of fish, hover over the school and fish vertically with a jig & minnow. These fish have been particularly interested in a slow presentation and at times weve had to stop moving the bait completely before they would bite.

     It has become a lot more common to locate Bluegills mixed in the same areas with the Crappies, so now days I have someone fishing with a jig and small piece of cut worm at all times. Its amazing how often the Crappies bite these worms and although the worm wouldnt be my first choice for Crappie, using them wont take you completely out of the action while you search for Bluegills.

Smallmouth Bonus pays off for Bud Freeman who caught his first ever while Walleye Fishing

A little bonus for fishing the deep breaklines with live bait rigs. The Smallmouth season is closed, so release 'em carefully.

     Northern Pike are getting pretty cooperative, but not on the larger casting baits or trolling lures. Weve found that the average size of pike were catching by jig & minnow fish is at least equal to the quality were getting on larger baits. They do seem to want meat right now though and Id recommend using either the jig & minnow approach or use a live bait rig with a lively minnow like a Redtail, Creek Chubb or Sucker. Ive had great luck with using a heavy 20-pound test fluorocarbon leader to protect from the bite off problems associated with using live bait for Pike. The patterns for the pike are varied, but anywhere that you find an abundance of food (for them), you will have some action. On a few of the area lakes with good Tulibee populations, were seeing the Pike gather along the steep drop off areas where these fall spawning bait fish are already staging. On the shallower lakes, were finding the Pike in areas where other forage including Walleyes or Perch is abundant.

     As the fishing season winds down for many, well still being going strong for another couple of weeks and Ill try to keep you posted on the changing conditions. After that, Im hoping to take a little break and do some hunting.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright Jeff Sundin 2005


September 2005

Fishing Report 9/26/05 Early Fall Big Fish Bite Is On!  - Jeff Sundin

    

     Amidst the turbulent weather and cooling water temperatures, the big fish in the Itasca Area are on the prowl. Thanks to some rainy days and cool nights water temperatures are dipping in to the lower sixty-degree range. Some weeds are beginning to die off and there are noticeable movements of bait and fish out to the deeper shoreline breaks and points.

 

Jeff Sundin, Minnesota Fishing Guide shows off a lunker Walleye

Large Walleyes like these don't come along every five minutes. But if you're up for the search and have a bit of patience, you can catch one. Smaller Walleyes and Pike keep you busy during the search.

    

     Thanks to a special project weve been working on, Ive had a chance to fish several area lakes in search of larger fish and it has been a ball. Walleyes and Pike have been using the deeper portions of the best shoreline structures. These are structures like points or deep inside turns that have all of the cover a big fish would need. Before you start fishing, locate areas that combine shallow weedy flats, immediate access to deeper water (thirty to seventy feet or deeper), rocks & clam beds. Once I have a few spots in mind, I watch my graph for fish on the edges of the deeper breakline. Key depths for me have been 24 to 36 feet of water. You will discover fish deeper too, but for us the largest fish are hugging that initial deep breakline.

 

Pro Guide Jeff Sundin with another nice Walleye caught on a creek chebb.

Another nice example of rigging up a Large Walleye. This one was laying on the edge of some deep rocks in about thirty feet of water and fell for a rigged Creek Chubb.

     Walleyes have responded well to large size Creek Chubb and Redtails (when I could get them) fished on a Lindy rig with a ounce sinker and five-foot leader. To give us an extra measure of safety in landing the large pike, I tied the leaders with 1/0 hooks and 20 pound fluorocarbon line that has a durable, clear finish. Thanks to these leaders, weve only lost one pike due to a bite off in the past week. Id really recommend looking in to this stuff.

     Some of the better Walleyes have also responded well to night crawlers fished on a more conventional rig and as a back plan, the crawlers would be an excellent second choice. We used a size 4 hook and tied the leader using six-pound Berkley Iron Silk line. This is also a good, durable line for tying the lighter leaders. If you want to get into this subject in more depth, click here to read an article on the subject.

 

Bob Carlson, captured this large Walleye using a Lindy Rig and Night Crawler

    

     Meanwhile, the Walleyes of eating and action size are gathering in larger schools in the shallow water weed beds making the fishing really fun for lots of folks. Weeds found in water depths of 6 to 12 feet are holding lots of baitfish and the Walleyes are in there feeding heavily for the winter. This low sixty-degree water is perfect for this action bite and we should have fairly reliable fishing for the next week to ten days and if the weather holds, maybe even longer.

     Folks using every kind of bait from soup to nuts are capturing walleyes. Leeches, Crawlers and jig & minnow combos are all producing fish and for the time being its "anglers choice" fishing. However, the jig and minnow bite is getting more reliable by the day and this will continue to improve as the waters cool down. My personal advice would be jig & minnow on breezy days and night crawlers on calm days. Even though the action has been best around the weeds, Id check the rocks too especially on windy days.

 

Northern Pike fall for these rigged minnows too!

     Crappies are moving out into some of the more open terrain and can be found in small packs. Its been a little unpredictable and sometimes the bite has been sluggish requiring lots of attention to trigger a bite from the fish. More and more now Ive been waiting for the last couple of hours of daylight before going after them and it seems to help. The method for catching them is largely the same as its been during past reports except that we are now searching a little further out from the breaklines and open water, soft bottom areas are becoming more important to us. Look for any sign of a roaming pack of fish, hover over the school and fish vertically with a jig & minnow. These fish have been particularly interested in a slow presentation and at times weve had to stop moving the bait completely before they would bite.

 

Sharon Karels has what it takes to catch nice Bluegills in the Grand Rapids Area    

Nice size bluegills are starting to roam the deep water just like the Crappies. A good way to fish these areas are to set up one angler with a worm and another with a minnow. Once you see what kind of fish comes up you can switch baits accordingly.

 

     Bluegills are also locating further out into open water and finding them is a lot like finding the Crappies. In fact, weve found some of the schools mixed with Crappies. A smaller jig tipped with a piece of cut night crawler or a tiny leech has worked fairly well for the gills.

     Largemouth Bass are still scattered, but mainly located on the deep edges of healthy green weedbeds. The better fishing is still found by using soft plastics and casting to the deep weed edges. But, the spinnerbait bite is coming on as well and it wont be too long before the fish concentrate on deep bulrush edges adjacent to good stands of Cabbage or Coontail weeds.

Smallmouth Bass are still located on deep structure like sunken islands or deep underwater points with rocky cover. Fishing the edges with rigs and minnows has been working well. A four to six inch minnow like a golden shiner, large rainbow or even a smaller creek chubb will work well.

     Musky and Pike anglers are back in business again this week with good fish movement in the shallows where good schools of Perch and Walleyes are beginning to gather. Top water baits, crankbaits and wood are turning them on right now and theres been a pretty nice sampling of larger Pike mixed in with them. As Tulibees and or whitefish begin staging in their fall spawning areas, look for the Musky/Pike action to build over the next few weeks.

 

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright Jeff Sundin 2005


UPNORTH Fishing Report 9-12-2005 Jason Green

Cool Down Kicks It Up A Notch

     Cool nights and comfortable days are pushing water temperatures down into the mid 60 degree range.  With water temps on the move so are the fish.  Walleyes are being found from the shallow shorelines on out to deep mid lake structure.

     When working mid lake structure, pulling a 5' Roach Rig with a leech is still producing well but we are starting to see increased results with a Rainbow Spinner.  A Rainbow Spinner will allow you to cover more water quickly when searching for larger schools of active fish.

     The shoreline bite has almost been phenomenal the past couple days.  Fish are starting their fall patterns which means a jig and minnow combination is back in action.  When trying to locate shoreline fish it is a good practice to look for weeds in 6'-8' of water on your electronics.  These weed covered sweet spots will also have deeper water near by.  Fish the weeds with 1/16oz ball style jig such as a Fireball tipped with a shiner and use a snap or hopping action.  Boy does it get them riled up!

     Check back often, duck hunting reports will be starting soon!

Fishing The Shallow Weeds With A Jig And Minnow Are Giving Kids A Lot Of Excitement Not Only With Walleyes But With Perch And Pike Also.

 

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com


Fishing Report 9/8/05 Fall Progression Continues

     September takes forever to arrive and it feels like its over in about a half-hour. Get out here now and enjoy it while you can. Fish in the Grand Rapids and Deer River area are responding to the falling water temperatures and the early fall bite is getting more reliable each day. One caveat is that the fish arent completely moved into their fall locations, so youll have to do some looking to find the areas that attract the earliest groups of fish.

Pike are hungry! This medium size Pike inhaled this big Salmo Warrior. Lots of Pike action as they put on the feed bag for fall.

     With the water temperatures remaining in the mid sixty degree range, Walleye anglers can still locate some fish on the deeper main lake bars and points, where we continue to use Leeches fished on a live bait rig with about a five foot leader. The deep breaklines that are adjacent to large flats that meander toward the shoreline are especially good because these flats are key transition routes as the fish make their way to the main shoreline breaks where baitfish will be gathered. During the transition, fish will stop and feed near small rock piles or near deeper isolated weedbeds. The fish that use these areas will be transient, so if you want to fish the flats, be prepared to cover lots of water and keep a constant eye on your electronics to reveal new spots to fish. Spinners and bottom bouncers, trolling crankbaits or even jigging at a fast pace will put some fish in the boat.

     Walleyes that weve located in the shallower water have been responding better to jig and minnow fishing and now that these fish are arriving in decent numbers, were putting more emphasis on this approach. The action is generally faster and the likelihood of a mixed bag appeals to lots of my customers. Shallow water fish are generally relating directly to the weeds except when there is enough wind to stir up some action on and around rocks or mixed rock and weeds. For the time being, if the water is calm, skip the rocks and search in the weeds. If you like to fish live bait rigs instead of jigs, try using a light bullet sinker, a three to four foot leader and a crawler in these shallow weeds.

     Northern Pike action has continued to improve and weve found that many of the Pike weve kept have been feeding on Tulibees. The Tulibees are located in areas where the larger flats containing mixed rock and gravel. Concentrating on the weedbeds adjacent to these flats has been good for us. The best bait selection for casting has been the large minnow type baits that I mentioned in last weeks report. The Salmo baits, especially the number 18 Whitefish have been consistently producing the best number of fish. We are also catching some pike on the Suick and a few on the larger Bucktail baits. Rattle baits that produced so well a couple of weeks ago, have slipped off the charts and while we continue to experiment with them, theyve been poor producers this week.

     Crappies have taken over the lead position in Panfishing right now and with many schools of fish forming in the deeper water, this has been a reliable way to add some action to the day. We are now bringing some crappies in every day. Theres only one key to finding and catching these fish, slowly follow the deeper drop off searching for schools of fish suspending in water from 18 to 26 feet deep. Once a school of fish is located, hold the boat stationary above the school and drop your jig/minnow slowly into the school of Crappie. These fish like to be teased and a bait that falls slowly (or is lowered slowly by the angler) will produce a lot of bites before your jig can reach the bottom. If it does reach bottom without attracting a bite, slowly raise it back up again about a foot or so at a time. Repeat this process as needed until you uncover the trick of the day for getting them to snap up the bait. Crappies will suspend fairly high above the bottom so really effective Crappie anglers are continually probing up and down like this to locate the level that fish prefer on a given day. Dont be surprised by fish that come up to within a few feet of the surface, these fish are active and will bite readily if you remember to bring your bait up high enough to catch them.

      Bluegill anglers continue to find some fish along the deeper weed edges and deep drop off areas close to these weedy flats. Weve caught them by fishing near the bottom with a small jig, ice fly or hook/splitshot. Waxworms, tiny leeches and cut pieces of night crawler are all about equal. The Bluegills seem to require less movement right now and a bat fished almost motionless a few inches above the bottom has worked fairly well.

Its been a busy week and I have to cut the report a bit short today, I have additional information about Bass and Musky fishing that I will update tomorrow. Check back if thats your cup of tea.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright Jeff Sundin 2005

Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 9-6-05

Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 9-5-05
     The big story on winnie is still the south bars. Rigs are working the best so far and the fish seem to be on the shallower part of the bars. I havent been using real long snells, just 4-6 ft. seem to work the best. There are some fish still on the rocks on the north end with jig and minnow but it hasnt been real consistent. Lots of perch on those rocks with a 1/8 jig and a shiner really working well. As it moves closer to fall look for those fish to start moving in to the shallows anytime now. Cutfoot and the panfish have also been pretty cool deal. Crappies are out in the deep stuff suspended and the gills are in the deep weeds.
     Sand, Bowstring are doing pretty good too. With some walleyes in the weeds with jig and minnow and the crappies suspended in the deep water over cribs and rock points. Pokegama is still hot for the Northerns. Jigging them deep with a oz gumball jig and a bigger shiner. They have been some beauties this year. Good luck fishing - Jason Boser

Fishing Fever Guide Service - boser@grandrapidsmn.com - Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/ Mnfishingpros.com

 

Click here to Join       Contact Us      Contact Webmaster

Fred's Bait Supply Wholesale - Fred's Bait Shop Retail  Hwy 2 West, Deer River, MN 56636   218-246-8710   fredbait@paulbunyan.net   www.fredsbait.com  Copyright 2003-2005 Fred's Bait. Copyright 2003-2007 Fred's Bait. Site Design link to Early Bird Web Design Contact Webmaster