Fred's Live Bait and Tackle Northern Minnesota Archived Fishing Reports Summer 2005

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Archived Fishing Reports Summer 2005

August 2005

Fishing Report 8-31-05 Walleyes and Pike On The Move!

     Another week of cool weather has continued to whittle away at surface temperatures bringing them down another degree or two on most lakes. Mid sixty degree water continues to encourage fish to move toward fall locations.

     There’s both good and bad news for Walleye anglers as the transition occurs. It’s great that the fish are feeding and biting aggressively. It’s not so great that they keep moving every day and that you have to begin your search anew each time you head to the lake. For really versatile anglers, there have been enough fish to keep it interesting and there are even some banner days when hitting a large, active school produces fast action. These are larger groups of fish moving (slowly) along the deeper main lake bars toward shallower flats adjacent to the shoreline. These large, mid depth flats in 10 to 16 feet of water are holding good numbers of fish. The problem is that fish are spread out over a large area and can be tough to pin down.

     In deep water, especially on the main breaklines, we continue to use Leeches fished on a live bait rig with about a five foot leader. While we’ve had the best action with them out deep, there are a variety of other baits all working equally well in the shallow water. Crawlers and minnows are becoming the preferred weedline baits and there are some fish being caught trolling crankbaits on the outer edges of the weedline. Jig and minnow fishing can produce the best overall action right now and will likely yield a variety of species.

Salmo Whitefish and Salmo Warrior produce nice Northern Pike in early fall

The Salmo Sinking Warrior (top) and the Salmo Whitefish (bottom) have both been excellent producers for nice Pike this week. Fish the Warrior like any other jerk bait, The Whitefish is a straightforward crankbait that we cast and retireve quickly.

     Northern Pike action is really heating up! Fish are gathering in larger numbers along the shoreline in weed beds as baitfish continue to stack up. We’ve been able to locate some good size fish by and some fairly good numbers by casting large Musky/Pike size baits. This is the preferred method for me because it generally produces fish of larger average size. Some really shining stars during the past couple of days have been large minnow type baits that remind these Pike of Tulibees or possibly even Walleyes in these shallow weedbeds. Two baits have been especially good, the Warrior produced by Salmo is a sinking bait that should be fished just like you’d fish other jerk baits except this one can be fished at any depth you choose and it has really produced well this week. The Whitefish (Shallow Runner) is a straightforward crankbait that has been best when cast and retrieved straight back to the boat rather quickly. Pike have been tearing this bait up. Other baits worth mentioning are the large size rattletraps, which have produced very well also.

     Bluegill anglers continue to do well, although the average size seems to have slipped a bit during the past week. We’ve found that while most of the bluegills continue to be located in the weeds and on the weed edges, there are some fish moving out deeper to the main drop off as well. We’ve caught some of these deeper fish while searching for Crappies and the only difference between catching Crappie and Bluegill has been switching between minnows and cut pieces of worm. Incidentally, I’ve caught an awful lot of Crappies on the cut worms and it may be worth having at least one person in the fishing boat stick with this method just in case you can get the double whammy going. A simple 1/16 or 1/8 ounce jig head in dark green, black or brown has been great for the gills.

Most any of these compact size jigs will get the Bluegills going. We use cut pieces of worm, but waxies or other small grubs work well too.

     Crappies are getting more reliable as an option right now. There are more and larger schools of fish hugging the first drop off into deep water. Try following the edges at roughly 18 to 24 feet and watch your electronics closely for any signs of baitfish, schools of Crappie or even isolated deep weeds or brush. The fish are a little stubborn, but once you get the first fish or two, the rest of the school will perk up and give you an action spurt. 1-16 to 1-8 ounce jigs tipped with a minnow and fished vertically will get you some fish right now.

     Bass fishing continues to provide consistent action and while my favorite method, plastic worms on the deep weedline will still provide plenty of strikes, the spinnerbaits and crankbaits are picking as well. If you like casting, the next few weeks will be prime time for the early fall spinnerbait bite as fish are feeding actively for fall. We especially like to fish the bulrushes in areas immediately adjacent to deeper water. Cast your spinnerbait into the pockets between heavier patches of bulrushes and retrieve steadily toward the deeper breaks.

     Smallmouth are on the deepest parts of shoreline points, rocky bars and along the clean lip area outside of some deeper weed beds. They’ve been catchable on artificial baits, but they’re after meat right now and fishing with a live bait rig tipped with medium sized minnows is the best. Fish them like you would fish Walleyes except don’t feed line to the fish when they pick up the bait. Just let them snuggle up a bit and gently set the hook. Over feeding these fish can result in damage to the fish making releasing them difficult or impossible. - Good luck this week, check back for updates.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

Fishing Report 8-24-05 Fish in transition to fall locations, variety bite improving daily.

     After a cool week, Surface temperatures are falling into the upper sixty degree range with readings on some lakes creeping back into the seventies during afternoon sunshine. Fish movements are evident and lots of folks are finding that their favorite summer fishing spots are gradually becoming less populated as the fish move into staging areas on their way toward the shallows and other preferred fall locations.

     Walleye fishing has been good for versatile anglers who have spent some time searching for the better schools of fish and located new habitat. The mid summer patterns of following main lake fish that focused on insect hatches has given way to schools of fish that are in search of swarms of young of the year Perch and other types of minnows. These fish are feeding heavily on the minnows right now and once again the old adage "find the bait, find the fish" is coming into play. Weedline fishing has really improved with many of the schools of fish located just outside the weed edges on the cleaner drop off edges. Shoreline points and main lake bars adjacent to shoreline structure are key areas right now. Live bait rigging with Leeches has been my personal favorite for the past week, but we have caught several fish on night crawlers and even a few on jig & minnow. I’ve noticed that there are different preferences on different lakes and while the crawlers might be great on one lake, the fish in the next lake down the road may be biting better on the leeches. While I’ve been carrying minnows each day (mainly as a backup), we have yet to see the preference really switch over to minnows on any lake in the area.

Plenty of Walleyes and a nice one like this made it a good day to be Jill

    

     Bass fishing has been amazing! These critters are going very well on almost every lake I’ve tried and we’ve stumbled in to some fantastic action by fishing with jig and soft plastics. While the Bass have been aggressive, they have remained on the deeper weed edges and going deep with a 1/8-ounce jig head and plastic worm, crawdad or lizard has been the clear preference of these fish. We’ve had our best action on steeper drop off areas adjacent to weed flats or steep drop off areas adjacent to Lilly Pads. With all of the sun we’ve had lately, the Bass seem to really like that overhead cover as long as it’s near deeper water. We have not done really well in the heavy pads in shallower water, although there have been some fish in these areas. A Slug-go or similar type jerk worm rigged weedless is the ticket for these shallower fish.

     Bluegills are the name of the game in the world of panfishing right now. They have been biting aggressively on the deeper portions of the weed flats and out toward the weed points along shore. We’ve located many schools of Bluegills by fishing for the Bass with soft plastic baits and as we locate a school of Bluegills, we’ll take a few minutes to sample some fish by switching over to a small jig tipped with a wax worm, twister tail or half a crawler. If the fish are decent size, we’ll stop and fish them for a while. We've noticed that the smaller and more aggressive fish are quick to move toward the bait and will come quickly toward the surface to bite. We have to avoid temptation to cater to these aggressive biters and get the jig quickly to the bottom where there seems to be a better chance of catching nicer size fish. If necessary, switch to a 1/8 ounce jig with a smaller than average hook and fish it motionless near the bottom. You'll get less fish, better quality.

     Crappies are getting more reliable as an option right now. There are more and larger schools of fish hugging the first drop off into deep water. Try following the edges at roughly 18 to 24 feet and watch your electronics closely for any signs of baitfish, schools of Crappie or even isolated deep weeds or brush. The fish are a little stubborn, but once you get the first fish or two, the rest of the school will perk up and give you an action spurt. 1-16 to 1-8 ounce jigs tipped with a minnow and fished vertically will get you some fish right now.

     Muskies did what they always do! The recent full moon and related stormy weather was just what the doctor ordered for anglers in the area. There was a two or three day period of good action for the big critters. Action was better on crankbaits like the giant size Rattle Traps and Salmos. The sunny weather hasn’t been good news for those of us who want to stretch the bite out for a while, but there are fish in the better weed beds right now and I’d recommend casting every time the weather gets favorable.

     Smallmouth are on the deepest parts of shoreline points, rocky bars and along the clean lip area outside of some deeper weed beds. They’ve been catchable on artificial baits, but they’re after meat right now and fishing with a live bait rig tipped with medium sized minnows is the best. Fish them like you would fish Walleyes except don’t feed line to the fish when they pick up the bait. Just let them snuggle up a bit and gently set the hook. Over feeding these fish can result in damage to the fish making releasing them difficult or impossible.

     Northern Pike are gathering in larger numbers in the shoreline weed beds and we’ve been able to locate some good fish by using a jig and minnow as a search lure. Once you’ve located an area where Pike are present, you can change your approach to casting in the area. It seems that casting will get some of the larger fish that prefer more size to the baits you’re using. Move frequently from weedbed to weedbed because some are occupied while others are empty. If you move enough, you’ll locate some active fish.

 

 Cormorants in flight on Big Winnie August 2005      Cormorants setting up roosting areas on Cutfoot Sioux Lake 

Cormorants appear to be taking up permanent residence in Cutfoot Sioux Lake this summer. There have been birds in the past, but they've never looked more at home than they do now.

    

     For those of you who have been following the stories about the status of the overpopulation of Cormorants in the area, I’d like to alert you to a fairly new development. A thousand or so (maybe more) Cormorants appear to be taking up permanent residence in Cutfoot Sioux Lake. We’ve been seeing some flocks of birds in the Winnibigosh and Cutfoot areas for years, but these are birds not simply passing through the area, but living here and feeding daily on fish from one of the most popular and highly prized fisheries in the state. It would be a shame to see the balance between these hungry birds and the fish go out of whack as it did on Leech Lake causing or contributing to the crash of the Walleye fishery on that great lake.

     I’d sure appreciate you taking the time to look into this issue a bit more and contact the DNR Fisheries Manager Chris Kavanaugh in Grand Rapids to discuss the potential threat to the area fisheries and related tourism businesses. The phone the regional office, call 218-327-4430 or go ahead and use this handy link to contact him by email chris.kavanaugh@dnr.state.mn.us. It takes time for the DNR to respond to concerns, but in my experience, they will do so if we stay in touch with them. I’d encourage you to have a chat, just to get brought up to speed on sport fishing related issues. You will always learn something.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 8-22-05

           You can feel fall is in the air, warm days cool nights. The fishing on winnie is pretty consistent. The rocks are holding some perch, walleye and some northern. They are mainly caught on a jig and minnow. The south bars, Bena, Sugar, center and Muskie are all producing fish with a lindy and a leech or a crawler. Trolling cranks along the east shore and the west shore is also a good bet this last week with a lot of fish coming in on this presentation.
          Sand, Bowstring and even Jessie are starting to produce some crappie out in the deep water. The walleye bite has also been consistent on these area lakes. Most the fish are coming in with a jig and a shiner right now. The weeds seem to be holding most of the fish. The Northerns are still going strong on Pokegama and you even get an occasional walleye while jigging that deep weed line. Now is the time to be on the water with a nice mixed bag of fish

Good luck fishing - Jason Boser

Fishing Fever Guide Service - boser@grandrapidsmn.com - Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/ Mnfishingpros.com


Fishing Report 8-17-05 First Hint of Fall Movements

     Here it is. The full moon of August arrives along with the earliest signs of fall. Cool nights, warm days and gradually falling water temperatures. The warmest water temperatures of the season are behind us now as surface temperatures on most of the Grand Rapids area lakes have fallen below 70 degrees. Loons are gathering in larger flocks in preparation for their fall flight south and the falling temperatures are influencing fish and fish movements. From past experience, we should notice an increase in shallow water fish movements for the rest of this week followed by another lull in the action before the true fall fishing season begins.

Dan Fischbach with a great Northern Minnesota Walleye


     Walleye fishing has been good for versatile anglers who have spent some time searching for the better schools of fish and located new habitat. The mid summer patterns of following main lake fish that focused on insect hatches has given way to schools of fish that are in search of swarms of young of the year Perch and other types of minnows. These fish are feeding heavily on the minnows right now and once again the old adage “find the bait, find the fish” is coming into play. Weedline fishing has really improved with many of the schools of fish located just outside the weed edges on the cleaner drop off edges. Shoreline points and main lake bars adjacent to shoreline structure are key areas right now. Live bait rigging with Leeches has been my personal favorite for the past week, but we have caught several fish on night crawlers and even a few on jig & minnow. I’ve noticed that there are different preferences on different lakes and while the crawlers might be great on one lake, the fish in the next lake down the road may be biting better on the leeches. While I’ve been carrying minnows each day (mainly as a backup), we have yet to see the preference really switch over to minnows on any lake in the area.
     Northern Pike are responding slightly to the decreasing water temperatures and some decent size fish are beginning to arrive on the weed edges near the shoreline. Casting large rattle baits and spinnerbaits has begun to produce some fish. Not an all out hot bite, but enough action to make it something to think about on your next trip out to the lake.
      Bluegills are the name of the game in the world of panfish fishing right now. They have been biting aggressively on the deeper portions of the weed flats and out toward the weed points along shore. We’ve located many schools of Bluegills by fishing for the Bass with soft plastic baits and as we locate a school of Bluegills, we’ll take a few minutes to sample some fish by switching over to a small jig tipped with a wax worm, twister tail or half a crawler. If the fish are decent size, we’ll stop and fish them for a while. We've noticed that the smaller and more aggressive fish are quick to move toward the bait and will come quickly toward the surface to bite. We have to avoid temptation to cater to these aggressive biters and get the jig quickly to the bottom where there seems to be a better chance of catching nicer size fish. If necessary, switch to a 1/8 ounce jig with a smaller than average hook and fish it motionless near the bottom. You'll get less fish, better quality.

     Bass fishing has been amazing! These critters are going very well on almost every lake I’ve tried and we’ve stumbled in to some fantastic action by fishing with jig and soft plastics. While the Bass have been aggressive, they have remained on the deeper weed edges and going deep with a 1/8-ounce jig head and plastic worm, crawdad or lizard has been the clear preference of these fish. We’ve had our best action on steeper drop off areas adjacent to weed flats or steep drop off areas adjacent to Lilly Pads. With all of the sun we’ve had lately, the Bass seem to really like that overhead cover as long as it’s near deeper water. We have not done really well in the heavy pads in shallower water, although there have been some fish in these areas. A Slug-go or similar type jerk worm rigged weedless is the ticket for these shallower fish.

Keith Murdock shows that Minnesota is a great Bass fishing destination


     Smallmouth are on the deepest parts of shoreline points, rocky bars and along the clean lip area outside of some deeper weed beds. They’ve been catchable on artificial baits, but they’re after meat right now and fishing with a live bait rig tipped with medium sized minnows is the best. Fish them like you would fish Walleyes except don’t feed line to the fish when they pick up the bait. Just let them snuggle up a bit and gently set the hook. Over feeding these fish can result in damage to the fish making releasing them difficult or impossible.
     Crappies are still hit and miss. We’ve had a few good sessions and a few slow ones. The biting fish we’ve found are located in heavy cover like brush and deeper cabbage weeds. We’ve had to fish vertically with a 1/16-ounce jig head tipped with a small minnow. Let the jig fall into the deep cover and experiment by raising and lowering your rod tip slowly until you find a level that they like. My approach has been to take an hour or so to experiment and if they seem to be cooperative, keep searching. If your favorite spots aren’t producing, move on to something else until evening time when the Crappies move around more freely.
     I sure wish I had a Musky report for you, but my Musky schedule has fallen apart this summer, Cancellations of several Musky trips have resulted in re-booking the dates to folks that have been more interested in the faster action of Bass, Walleye and Panfish. So I haven’t been hitting the water as hard as normal for the Muskies this month. According to reports from other folks, the Musky fishing has picked up in the past several days and I’ve always been an advocate of fishing hard for Muskies during the Full moon periods of July, August and September. That’s right now and I’m lucky to have a Musky trip coming this weekend. Hopefully, I can give a better report next week.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 8-15-05

          The fish on Winnie are on the move. No more going out to the humps and just catching fish. The bigger bars on the south end seem to be where the fish are in the shallower water 14-19 ft. Long line lindys in the 6-10ft snells seem to be the ticket. Trolling with shad raps in the 7-12 ft are also working, Along the west shore. The jig and minnow is also back working in the rocks off the shore and in the weeds. Lots of options for fishing right now and the key is to be versatile.
          The other area lakes are doing the same with the jig and minnow really starting to out produce most other presentations. Pokie is still going strong on the Northern Bass and walleye on the deep weed edges. Sand and Bowstring the same. The Sunnies seem to have gone on a feeding binge in some of our area lakes also with the deep weed edges being the key holders of fish, with a small jig and a leech. Lots of different action on different lakes going on now.

Fishing Fever Guide Service - boser@grandrapidsmn.com - Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/ Mnfishingpros.com


Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 8-11-05
     Another week of hot weather. I hope we are done with that. Winnie has been fairly steady, with some different techniques starting to work. I have seen people out there trolling the open water over the main basin lately. I have never tried this I guess it does work. I have caught my fish on the humps, the 10-15 ft of water just off the shoreline and even seeing some fish in the weeds with a crank bait or even jig and minnow. So right now you have to try a lot of different presentations to find one that’s going good for that day. If one isn’t working be prepared to go t o another.
     Other area lakes are doing pretty well for the heat. On these smaller lakes the weeds seem to be the key for the Walleye. When you are fishing the weeds you never know what will be on your line, Northern, Bass, Perch, and some perch. It is a good action bite. Bowstrings, Sand Pokegama, splithand all have good weed bites right now. Good luck fishing - Jason Boser

Fishing Fever Guide Service - boser@grandrapidsmn.com - Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/ Mnfishingpros.com


Fishing Report 8-3-05 Family Fun in the Sun

     Back into the heat wave! Summer returned this week and with it, water temperatures climbing back into the low to mid eighty-degree range. We found surface temps of 85 on Monday and on several of the area lakes, Algae blooms have been getting much thicker. With water levels down to normal now, these blooms will start to color the lakes and we should be seeing an improvement in shoreline fishing on the lakes that remained unusually clear during the high water period earlier this summer.

     For me, the past week has been one of catering to family fishing trips where action fishing for Bass, Panfish and anything that bites is the rule of the day. Thankfully, the fish have been cooperative and for the families getting their last vacation before the school year starts up again, the hot, sunny summer weather has played right into their hands. I’ve never seen more folks tubing, swimming and skiing as we have this week. The conditions have been perfect!

Marcia Newton with a nice Minnesota Crappie

Crappie action is becoming a part of the daily mix again as these fish locate on the deeper weed edges and out on the deeper main lake drop-offs. Dream girl, Marcia Newton shows off a nice fish she fooled by fishing vertically with a 1/16 ounce jig head and small minnow.

Sunny hot weather forces these fish to hold tight to cover, fish vertical and slow!

     Crappie fishing has begun to enter into the daily mix again as these fish have started to stage out toward deeper main lake breaklines and the deep outside edges of standing weeds. With the sunny weather, the Crappies have stayed in tight to the cover and to catch them we’ve had to move slowly along the edge and dip a 1/16 ounce jig head tipped with a minnow or 1-1/2 inch tube tail down into the cover. Move too fast and they won’t bite, but give them a little time to spot your jig and they are hitting it hard. It’s slow going until you find them, but once you do, there are flurries where you’ll get ten or more at a time. When the action dies down, start the search again for the next batch. If you happen to know the location of some brush piles or DNR Crappie Cribs, there are fish using these structures as well. Same rule applies, fish slow and vertical giving the jig plenty of time to work toward the bottom. For Crappies that locate in open water near the main drop-off or on the edges of structure, you can move a bit faster. Because these fish are out deeper, it’s better to go with a slightly heavier jig like a 1/8 ounce bug eye and move along the edge at a slow pace looking for an active fish. Once you locate a group of fish, stop the boat and use the vertical approach just like in the heavier cover.

     Walleye anglers are clearly dived now between those folks fishing the shallow weeds and those fishing the main lake bars and humps. There are good populations of fish both deep and shallow now, both suffering from a case of "over feeding" and both requiring anglers to have excellent timing. About every third day there is a great period of Walleye action and if you are there at that time, the fishing will be awesome. The other two days are anything from grinding out one fish at a time, to periods of action followed by a couple of hours of searching. In my opinion, the best bet right now is larger main lake structures like long bars adjacent to deep water. The fish have a variety of places to locate on these large structures and anglers can move along the edges until groups of fish are located.

     Live bait rigs with Night Crawlers and Leeches are producing fish on the structures and active fish are riding high on the top edges of the bars. Slowly back trolling along this upper lip has been effective. Weedline fish have been located in pockets where harder bottom mixes with the weeds. It’s possible to fish these weeds with live bait rigs if you replace the standard walking sinker with a bullet type sinker. These move through the weeds a bit easier. The leaders don't need to be really long, 4 to 5 feet will be plenty. I usually tie leaders that are just a bit shorter than the length of the fishing rods that we're using to make storage easier and that's been a good average for me.

     The hooks should also be a bit smaller too, this helps when you’re trying to wiggle through those standing weeds. If you think there are enough fish in an area, slip bobbers have been producing some fish. The only problem is that if the groups of fish are small, you may spend a lot of time fishing an area after you’ve already caught the few fish that were available. It’s not a bad idea to keep a slip bobber rigged up and ready to experiment as you move along the weed edges.   

     Largemouth Bass are still active and keeping us busy. Most of our fishing for them continues to be using the plastic worms, Crawfish imitators and jigs. Another effect of the hot sun is that we’re seeing more Bass locating on the edge of Lily Pads now. Especially where the Lily pads are adjacent to deeper drop-off areas. The fish seem to be trading back and forth between the shallower (but heavy) overhead cover and the deeper wed edges where the food is much more plentiful. I think they’re feeding on the weed edges and holding in the heavier pads when the sun is bright and high in sky.

Eddy admires one of the first Largemouth Bass of his fishing career

Family fishing trips are a big part of late summer. With only a few weeks left until school starts, most folks are enjoying their last vacation of the summer.

Weather has been perfect for the family trips! Warm water fish like Bass and Bluegills keep kids plenty busy and there's enough large fish action to keep the adults happy at the same time.

     Bluegills are incredibly active right now and we’ve been locating huge schools of fish that attack everything we put in front of them. It’s been common to locate them while we’re casting for the Bass. Once we find them, we move the boat in shallower until we’re right in the weeds. We can see schools of 50 to 200 fish swim toward the bait. Once they’re located, use a small jig head tipped with a cut piece of worm. Size of the fish depends on the lake you’re fishing. I think it’s important to take a variety of sizes and don’t be bashful to utilize some of the smaller fish. They are excellent for pickling and many lakes suffer from over population of stunted fish. I know it doesn’t look as good when you come into the fish cleaning shack, but you really are doing the lake a favor by taking some of the smaller fish. Anyone willing to do that should be able to easily get plenty of these scrappy fishes right now.

     Northern Pike are also tucking in to the heavier cover and we’ve noticed that with the warmer water temps, these fish have become less active. Really warm water temperatures are not ideal for Pike, but for folks who like to cover ground trolling the deeper weed edges, there are some fish to be caught. Deeper running Crank Baits like the Salmo’s fished near the edge of deep weeds will catch you some keeper size fish. We’re also catching some decent size fish while we cast to the deep weeds for Bass, but the pike are deep on those edges in heavy cover. Spinnerbaits and other fast moving surface baits are not really producing just yet. Look for the faster approach to start picking up as fish begin moving back toward the shallows in the next few weeks.

     Muskies action is heating back up again as it did during the first heat wave. The best action has been on the lakes that have more color from Algae blooms. It’s harder to see your fish, but there easier to catch. The deeper clear water lakes have plenty of follow up action, but most of these fish have been lookers and not takers. Top-water baits fished over heavy cover have been our best bet so far.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

UPNORTH Fishing Report 8-1-2005 Jason Green

Water Temps Stabilize Making For A Consistent Bite

This past week water temperatures have stabilized in the mid 70's making for a consistent bite and very comfortable angling conditions for all ages.

During low light periods we have been concentrating our efforts on small humps that top off in 9' of water.  These humps are relatively easy to find even without electronics because of minnows bubbling at the surface as walleye feed.  When working these shallow pieces of structure we have found that a 2' roach rig tipped with a leech is working best.

As the day progresses and the sun is high most the active fish are being found on deep flats and bars in 20'-30' of water.  This deep water bite will also require that you add some length to your presentation.  5'-6' is keeping your bait in the strike zone and depending on the day both leeches and crawlers are producing equally.


Beautiful Warm Sunny Days With A Light Wind Have
Made For A Great Week On The Water In The
1000 Grand Lakes Area.
 

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com

July 2005

Fishing Report 7/27/05 Jeff Sundin – Weather Cooler, Action Hotter!

A welcome relief for my white Norwegian skin has been this weeks cool front that moved surface water temperatures back down into the mid seventy degree range. The fish seemed to welcome the cooler weather as much as we did because the action has been good for the first part of the week. No real big changes in fishing style or presentation have been required, following the same basic game plan as I described last week has been holding up really well.

Mitch Long and Char Benson enjoying a great day of Bass fishing. These are not giants, but the average size has been fantastic with an occasional large fish to make it interesting.

Fishing with soft plastic Crawdad imitators or large tube tails are perfect for tricking hungry Bass that are feeding on hatching Crawfish. Look for areas where weedlines meet with Rock or gravel stretches and fish these baits on the bottom with a twitching or hopping action.

    Largemouth Bass continue to be the highlight of my fishing. These fish are active and running very nice in average size. Like the Pike, Bass are holding on the deep weedlines making this perfect for folks who want the action bite. With a 1/8-ounce jig, a plastic worm or other soft plastic creature we have the system dialed in for the time being. Hold your boat at the outside edge of deep weeds in 12 to 25 feet of water cast to the deep weed edges and hold on! Find weeds that have rocks mixed in and do even better! Here’s a tip that I stumbled in to this week; there’s a new crop of Crawfish hatching on the gravel and rock areas adjacent to the deeper weeds. We’ve been using a 2-1/2inch crawfish on a 1/8 ounce jig head and both the Bass and the Pike are gobbling them up. Yesterday (Tuesday) we fished almost exclusively with these crawdad imitators.

     Panfish are set up on these deeper weeds as well and every day we have a little more action from the Sunfish that pick at the tails of these soft plastic baits. When you discover an area that’s holding panfish, you can re-group and switch over to smaller jigs. With warm water, smaller soft plastic baits like a 1-1/2 inch tubes or shad bodies will catch plenty of panfish. The old stand-by, 1/16-ounce feather or marabou jigs are great too. An ultra light rod and light line will make it easier to cast and fish these small jigs so I’d recommend having a special one rigged and ready to go.

     The water is so warm right now that these fish are active. Bobbers don’t seem to be required and if anything, seem to be slowing down the action. It’s better to make short casts into the weeds, let the bait settle and work it back toward the boat with a swimming/hopping action.

Walleyes continue to roam the deeper flats and mid lake structures. Rigging with Leeches seems to have edged out the crawler bite by a slim margin, but depending on the lake, crawlers are still pretty reliable. I’ve been starting out each day with a couple of anglers using each bait and try to narrow it down from there. On a couple of lakes that have both Walleye and Smallmouth, we’ve caught both species in the same locations by rigging with larger size minnows. Redtails are working really nicely for this, but Creek Chubs, large Golden Shiners and even mid size Sucker minnows will work as well. If you like the action bite, jigging the deep weed line with smaller minnows is still producing everything from soup to nuts. Don’t be surprised if you catch a 4-inch Perch, 17-inch Bass and a 30-inch Northern Pike all on the same weedline.

 

Walleyes on the weedline come in lots of shapes and sizes. But Bill Spender caught and released one of the better examples of what happens when you get into the mixed bag action bite. Nothing wrong with catching one of these.

Northern Pike size has been improving this week, we’ve had several fish over 30 inches and a lot of fish in the 3 to 6 pound range. The fish are not responding very well to casting, but fishing deep with a jig and 4 to 5 inch minnow is turning out some nice fish. I suspect that anglers who like to bobber fish for Pike would have some good action as well because these fish are coming out of the deeper edges of the weedbeds. This is perfect for folks who want to anchor and let a large Sucker minnow do the work.

Muskies are slow to move into high gear so far this summer, but certain lakes are producing well right now. It’s going to take a little travelling, but you can find several lakes in Northern Minnesota where the action is heating up. Like the Pike, fish have been slow to move toward the shallows because of clear water, but lakes to the North of Deer River and Northeast of Grand Rapids are showing signs of improvement. We’ll be starting in on the serious search for these fish during the next week and Musky reports will get more detailed next time around.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 7-25-05
     The fish have really moved to the mid summer pattern now. We have been getting fish on deep-water structure and weeds. Lindy rig is the best choice right now, with leeches or crawlers. Winnie has been producing on the humps on the north and the center humps. They have moved up on the lip in that 22-24 ft of water. Snell lengths have been on the short side 3-5 ft working the best. In my case the leeches have been out producing crawlers. The main break in moxes hole and in front of high Banks has been also good.
     Other area lakes I have fished Pokegama and did real well on the Northerns we caught a lot of Bass and some decent smallies. They have been doing well on walleyes in the deep water and some crawlers but I never really gave that a try. Bowstring has been getting some fish on the north humps and in the weeds. Sand has been been a bit slow but we managed some fish in the weeds and deep humps also.

Fishing Fever Guide Service - boser@grandrapidsmn.com - Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/ Mnfishingpros.com


UPNORTH Fishing Report 7-22-2005 Jason Green

Midsummer Cool Down Activates Mid Day Bite

Wow, the end of July is approaching quickly!  Who would have thought that the open water season would be flying by so fast.  It appears that many of our lakes are experiencing another fish fly hatch but it seems to be some what isolated to certain areas leaving plenty of different areas to work.

Walleye- Up until a few days ago water temperatures were in the mid 80's on most area lakes and still climbing causing the mid day walleye bite to slow but over the past few nights the cool air has brought the temps back into the low to mid 70's reactivating the bite we have been looking for.

Mid lake humps and bars are still holding the best numbers of active fish with a 6' Roach Rig being the preferred presentation.  The past week a leech was the flavor of choice but the past two days both leeches and crawlers are working equally well

Smallmouth Bass- I would have to say that this has been one of the best summers I have ever seen for smallies.  Not only is the size  of these fish incredible but the numbers are there also.  Like fishing walleye, a 4'-6' Roach Rig tipped with a Power Leech has been working great or a jig with a plastic worm.  To locate these Goliath like Smallies start with their springtime spawning areas and find the first break into deep water.  We have been consistently pulling these fish out deep as you work your way back up to the shallow spawning locations or holding the boat on the break line and cast into the deeper water.
 


Cooler Water Temperatures Have Reactivated The Mid Day Walleye Bite


The Quality Of Smallies In The 1000 Grand Lakes Area
Make For A Great Day On The Water

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com


Fishing Report 7/20/05 Jeff Sundin – Mid Summer Patterns, Classic Action!

     Classic mid summer patterns and summer weather like it used to be! That’s what I’ll remember about 2005. Every day is a new experience, but the pattern is getting to be fairly predictable right now. Several days of building heat that ends with the inevitable cold front and accompanying thunderstorm. Fishing swings from really good to really tough depending on which day of the cycle you’re on at the time. But, for the most part, fishing action is holding up well for folks who are willing to work at it, especially if they’re willing to switch to the active species of the day.

Largemouth Bass like this one are showing up in good numbers on the deep weed edges. Find a weedy point with rocks mixed in and your in the chips!

Helps keep your mind occupied when your boyfriend is golfing like a million miles away!

     With water temperatures now holding firmly in the upper seventies, there are stable populations of fish inhabiting the lush weedbeds and the weather changes seem to induce a daily re-structuring of the pecking order in these weed beds. For example; I’ve fished one popular Grand Rapids area lake 3 times during the past two weeks. On the first trip we had cool weather and breezy conditions. The deep wed edges were inhabited by walleye that we caught on jigs with minnows and crawlers. On the second trip we encountered warm, breezy weather and the deep weeds were filled with Northern Pike that we caught with jigs and minnows. On the third trip the weather was drizzly, cold and breezy and the same deep weeds were filled with active Bass that we caught on you guessed it, jigs and minnows. The locations never changed but as the shifts in weather influenced fish locations we were able to get in on some great action as long as we didn’t care which fish we found at these locations. This to me is the classic mid summer pattern and we’ll probably be looking at more of the same for the next month or so.

     Folks who are sticking with Walleye fishing in Northern Minnesota right now are finding the better schools of fish on mid lake bars and humps. Larger bars where you can set up a good long drift have been the best bet on windy days and smaller humps (reefs) are a better bet on calmer days. There are still several varieties of insects hatching out in the deep water and until these bugs clear up, there will always be some fish out deep. Huge schools of minnows located in the shallower weeds will eventually be a strong attraction for these Walleye, but they’re slow to move in. For the time being folks who like to fish weeds for Walleye ought to stick with the deepest weed beds, especially weeds near deeper main lake drop-offs.

     Every form of baits and tackle are working to some extent and while we’ve been having our best luck rigging with Crawlers, other anglers are swearing that only leeches are working. We’ve still caught some nice Walleyes on jig and minnow combos especially on rock reefs and deep weeds. There are also fish being caught by trolling crankbaits as well. So the upshot is fish with your favorite confidence baits and concentrate on location. You’ll catch enough Walleye to keep you happy.

     Northern Pike action has been fairly reliable for fish in the medium size range of three to six pounds. An occasional larger fish is caught, but we still have a way to go before the larger fish get easy to locate. Water color is beginning to improve as the high, clear water from this spring has receded a bit. Algae blooms are more evident each day and this will help in the search for larger pike. For now; spoons, spinnerbaits and jigs with soft plastic tails are working nicely on Pike. Some folks are trolling and doing well, but I prefer jigging the deeper edges and working them a bit more thoroughly. Again, fish how you like to fish and you will have some Pike action.

     Largemouth Bass are filling my heart with joy these days. This has been the highlight of the past week for me as we’ve located several schools of above average size Bass. Like the Pike, Bass are holding on the deep weedlines making this perfect for folks who want the action bite. With a 1/8-ounce jig, a plastic worm or other soft plastic creature we have the system dialed in for the time being. Hold your boat at the outside edge of deep weeds in 12 to 25 feet of water cast to the deep weed edges and hold on! Find weeds that have rocks mixed in and do even better!

     Panfish are just getting set up on these deeper weeds as well and every day we have a little more action from the Sunfish that pick at the tails of these soft plastic baits. When you discover an area that’s holding panfish, you can re-group and switch over to smaller jigs. With warm water, smaller soft plastic baits like a 1-1/2 inch tubes or shad bodies will catch plenty of panfish. The old stand-by, 1/16-ounce feather or marabou jigs are great too. An ultra light rod and light line will make it easier to cast and fish these small jigs so I’d recommend having a special one rigged and ready to go. The water is so warm right now that these fish are active. Bobbers don’t seem to be required and if anything, seem to be slowing down the action. It’s better to make short casts into the weeds, let the bait settle and work it back toward the boat with a swimming/hopping action.

     Muskies are slow to move into high gear so far this summer, but certain lakes are producing well right now. It’s going to take a little traveling, but you can find several lakes in Northern Minnesota where the action is heating up. Like the Pike, fish have been slow to move toward the shallows because of clear water, but lakes to the North of Deer River and Northeast of Grand Rapids are showing signs of improvement. We’ll be starting in on the serious search for these fish during the next week and Musky reports will get more detailed next time around.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 7-18-05

Hot! Hot! Hot! That’s all you can say about last week. The fishing despite the heat has been pretty good. The fish on Winnie moved up on the upper edges of the humps and the bit well. Leeches have been the best bet, for some reason they don’t seem to like those crawlers as much right now. I have only been running 5-7 ft rigs I haven’t had to go to the long ones yet. I have been starting to get a few Northerns in the weeds but nothing reel good yet. The perch I think are starting to show up on the humps and bars too.
Other area lakes have been alittle more tough with this warm weather. We have been getting a few on bowstring and sand but nothing great. Pokie, sugar and some of the other clear lakes have been putting out some fish but mostly at night.
Good luck fishing - Jason Boser

Fishing Fever Guide Service - boser@grandrapidsmn.com - Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/ Mnfishingpros.com

Fishing Report 7/13/05 Jeff Sundin – Mid Summer Variety Bite Is On

The weather has been downright hot! Water temperatures are now consistently in the upper seventy to low eighty-degree range and for the first time, we’re starting to see some color from Algae blooms in some of the Itasca area lakes. A sluggish bite that lasted through most of the recent heat wave finally gave way to better action with the arrival of a minor cool front a couple of days ago. In fact it was like a switch turned on just before a series of storms arrived on Monday and fish that had been fairly hard to catch, started feeding aggressively on Monday afternoon. As always, peaks and valleys in the action are part of the territory during mid summer, but the arrival of a North wind and a hint of dryer air really help pick up the pace.

One real bright spot is the arrival of fish to the mid summer weedline locations. Anglers who look forward to the weedline "action bite" are getting in on some of the summer’s best variety fishing. Bass, Pike, Walleye and panfish are all inhabiting the same weedlines on many of our smaller lakes and this is one of my favorite ways to fish during mid summer. Since the area is full of lakes like this, this is the perfect time to do some exploring and you’ll be amazed at how easy it is to find a nice quiet spot where you can work your magic.

 Largemouth Bass on the weed line, a traditional mid summer fishing approach in Northern Minnesota

Northern Minnesota Pike on the weed line

Not bad, Bass, Pike and Walleye all within a couple hundred feet along the same weed line.

Weed Walleye on a plastic worm, just another example of Minnesota Fishing at it's best.

Simple, but effective. That’s what working the weedline bite in mid summer is all about. Depending on which fish you really want to target, slight adjustments in bait and/or presentation can put you within casting distance of three, four maybe even more species all at the same time.

The fastest and easiest way to locate fish on the deep weed edges is to start by holding the boat just outside the main weedline and cast a 1/8-ounce jig head tipped with a plastic worm toward the weeds. Let the bait fall into the weeds until you make contact and then working mostly vertically, bring the bait back toward the boat using a series of twitches, hops and swimming motions. You can really vary your retrieve to suit the particular type of weeds you encounter along the way. Deep Coontail calls for a faster retrieve because it’s easier to snag, Cabbage weeds allow you to get your bait closer to the bottom and areas where weeds are mixed with rock or gravel provide opportunities for slow trolling through the pockets and edges.

The structures worth looking for will generally be large weed flats that have distinct edges at or near the deeper water drop-off. Sometimes, fish will be spread out across the flats instead of just using the deep edge. You can check this fairly quickly by casting a spinnerbait or shallow running crankbait across the flats. This is perfect for kids who need a little pick me up while you’re looking for a good school of fish. Another smart idea is to keep track of the type of cover where you locate fish. If it’s a Cabbage patch where you have your first good action, start zeroing in on more Cabbage. Likewise, if you find fish in Coontail, Bulrushes or other cover try to find more of the same type structure and you will likely see a pattern. Whenever you locate rocks adjacent to these weed beds, pay extra attention. Rocky spots harbor lots of food and provide great cover. Rocks will attract Bass, Pike and Walleyes.

Weed beds like this are a perfect hideout for mid summer fish of all kinds. Never pass up a chance to try this variety fishing approach. Time goes by fast when you're having fun!

Pay attention to the type of bites you happen to be getting in the area you’re fishing because once you locate fish, you might want to change your presentation to capitalize on a particular opportunity. For example; fish that grab the bait quickly and run sideways are probably Bass and fishing the plastic worm is perfect for them, but when you get bites that feel like a series of hard picking attacks, you’re probably being attacked by panfish. Switching to a small jig with a tiny tube or 2-inch twister tail will help you score on some of the panfish. Walleye will pick the plastic worms up and slowly move off giving you the sensation of pressure on the rod tip. When you get a few bites like this, switch to a live night crawler or minnow on your jig and you’ll increase the odds of getting more Walleye from that weedline. It’s possible to keep catching Walleye on the plastic too, so it pays to try varying the color and type of plastics you’re using to see if there’s one that really stands out on a given day.

Once you’ve discovered a couple of good opportunities, the choice to single out a particular target species will be yours. My personal preference is to keep working baits that provide the most action, but it is possible to single out a bait that works best on the fish you really want to catch. The process is mostly trial and error, but you will soon learn a few tricks of your own and be well on your way to finding out why I like this type of fishing so much.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 7-11-05
Another week of hot weather. The fish on winnie are doing their usual thing this time of the year they are deep. On the humps and bars around the edges and on the main lake drops. Most of the fish I have been catching have been on the deeper edge right where the mud meets the sand. The weeds are still holding a few fish but the majority seem to be out deep. Cranking has started to produce some fish on the edge of the weeds with the northerns being the main attraction there.
Trout Lake in coleraine is putting out some nice fish but not many. Pokegama is producing some fish on the weed edge with a crawler and a rig or jig and minnow. The night bite on sugar and pokie is also going well.
Good luck fishing - Jason Boser

Fishing Fever Guide Service - boser@grandrapidsmn.com - Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/ Mnfishingpros.com

UPNORTH Fishing Report 7-7-2005 Jason Green

There's A Break In The Clouds

I hope everyone one had a wonderful 4th of July!!!  It's been another beautiful week on the water but the "break in the clouds" we are referring to is the clouds of fish flies.  For the past two weeks fish have been gorging themselves on the larvae and newly hatched delicacies which are finally having an effect on the bite.  Finding fish has not been a problem but finding active fish the past two days has been a little bit more difficult.

Shore Lunch, Nothing Beats A Few Fresh Fillets, Potatoes And Beans After A Great Day On The Water

  For the past couple of weeks the area's we are fishing and the style remain the same.  Mid lake humps and bars are holding the most numbers but we are seeing increased activity in low light periods with some what of a lull mid day.

If You Look Closely You Can See That Something Has Taken A Healthy Sized Bite Out Of This 25" Walleye

  During the low light periods fish can be found on top of the structure which most of the time has been around 18'-20' but as the day progresses they seem to be moving deeper to 30'-34'.

  A 4'-6' Northland Roach Rig with a red hook and a jumbo leech is still producing best but we are noticing increased activity with a crawler and a few days where a jig and minnow will put a few in the boat.

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com


Fishing Report 7/05/05 Jeff Sundin – July Is Family Fishing Time!

Thanks everyone for being patient while I took a few days off to be with the family. Now after the birthdays and fireworks are over and I’ve had a little mid season break, we can get back down to fishing with renewed enthusiasm.

Needless to say, summer fishing patterns are still with us and for the most part the fish have made most of the biggest moves of the season already. Summer patterns will remain stable for the majority of the warm water season and fish locations should be fairly predictable for another month or maybe even longer. Because of frequent cool periods and high water, most of the Grand Rapids area lakes are amazingly clear for this time of year and even though surface temperatures have warmed up, I’d expect that we’d see scant evidence of any major fish kills this summer. For this reason, folks who want to start searching for those late summer Pike should expect to find them deeper than usual this summer.

Walleye anglers have mainly been keying in on the deep-water bite where Walleyes are feeding on insect larvae as it percolates near the bottom edges of main lake structures like bars, humps and expansive mud flats. It’s been hard to see the full effect of the Mayfly hatch this year because frequent high winds have kept the surface clear of the hatching flies. Nevertheless, it has been going on for a couple of weeks already and in some cases, warmer water lakes are almost past the prime time Mayfly hatch. As the fly larvae slowly makes it’s way toward the surface, the attraction loses its luster and locating schools of minnows will again be the key to Walleye location. On these lakes fish are finding their way back toward rock spines and deep weeds located near these large flats. The fish don’t necessarily move very far, just enough to locate a better source of food. Start by fishing areas where fish had gathered for the "fly-feast" and move toward structures with either rock or weeds until you re-locate the Walleye.

Weed growth is coming along nicely now and shallow water Walleyes are inhabiting the deeper portions of these new green weed beds. We noticed that areas where weeds meet deeper water, rocks or gravel are where the better schools of fish are holding. With the clear water, a nice chop on the surface helps break up the outline of the boat and helps get the fish moving. This has been the best bet for fishing the weeds. But when it’s calm, we’ve been able to catch some of these fish by going into the weeds and "flipping" our jigs tipped with either minnows or crawlers, into pockets. These pockets, (open spaces between weed clusters) offer Walleyes an ambush spot to catch bait as it moves through. The secret is to move through the weeds slowly with your trolling motor and making short casts into the weed pockets out ahead of the boat. This flipping technique is no secret to Bass anglers everywhere, but I’d say it’s been under utilized by Walleye Anglers and most fishing guides in Minnesota. It is definitely worth your time to give it a try.

This is the time of year that families can enjoy some great panfish action as Crappies, Bluegills and Perch begin gathering in larger numbers in predictable areas. It’s a great time to capitalize on those evening hours where the fish and mosquitoes all move at the same time. For folks who want to fish during the "bug spray bite", here’s a great tip that really works. Carry a bottle of Avon Skin So Soft (no we aren’t selling it) this has been the number one repellent for me this year. Another item that’s worked very well for the flies that bite on warm sunny days has been Cactus Juice, a product made from Prickly Pear Cactus. Both of these products work and they’re safer than the traditional bug spray. I prefer them because they don’t eat my equipment the way regular bug spray does and I don’t worry about putting it on my dogs.

Crappies have already begun showing up in the deeper, open water areas where we expect to see them in mid to late summer. These open water fish are currently holding near, but not necessarily on or in cover. Deep-water rocks, Deep Coontail or Cabbage weeds on the edge of the deeper breaklines are both holding some Crappies right now. You may notice that these fish are finicky during high light times right now. But gray days and low light periods in early morning or evening will encourage aggressive feeding.

Bluegills are moving away from shoreline areas where they just finished up spawning and are locating in the mixed coontail, cabbage and Grass lines on the flats adjacent to spawning areas. Like the Walleye, Bluegills will seek areas where insect larvae and small crustaceans inhabit mixed gravel and marl areas. When you locate a spot like this, you will have consistently good fishing for sunfish and Bluegills for at least a couple of weeks. Sometimes Crappies will key in on the same food source and you can have a mixed bag. Use the same technique I mentioned for locating weed Walleyes. Use your trolling motor to slowly move through the weed beds and casually flip out a 1/16 ounce jig tipped with a small worm or cut piece of night crawler. Once you find a couple of panfish, hold in that area. Fish vertically very near the bottom and use little or no motion. If there’s a better school of fish in the area, you’ll catch plenty of them by using this simple method. If the school of fish is sparse, keep moving until you locate a larger one. It may take some probing, but you will find them if you keep at it long enough to see it pay off.

Bass, both Smallmouth and Largemouth are locating in deeper water as well. Largemouth are showing up on the outer edges of deep weeds and Smallmouth are working the sand breaklines during the early morning, then moving to deeper points and steep breaklines with mixed rock or gravel. The Crawfish are slowly, but surely starting to appear on these areas and the natural attraction to Bass is powerful. This is a great time to fish with a jig and small plastic worm or crawtail. Use a fairly light jig and let the worm flutter in and around the structure. Spinnerbaits fished across the deep weed flats are also producing some nice Bass right now.

Larger Northern Pike are showing up on the deeper portions of the new green wed beds, especially on the deeper lakes that have been slower to warm up. Holding toward the deeper edges, they’ve been easier to catch with a jig and minnow. In fact, the largest fish we’ve caught in the past week have all been on a jig/minnow on the deeper weed edges. With all of the sunshine, it’s been tough to get these fish to move up and take spoons or crankbaits, but they would probably cooperate on a gray day with a little rain or chop on the water to make them move. An alternative to the jig/minnow fishing would be to slow troll a large sucker or Chubb along these deeper edges. Main lake structures adjacent to deep water are also holding some of the larger pike and we’re on the verge of the deep water trolling patterns that produce both Pike and Musky in the mid summer.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

June 2005

UPNORTH Fishing Report 6-29-2005 Jason Green

Summer Patterns In Full Swing

 Summer has been in full swing the past week in the 1000 Grand Lakes Area and for the most part fish have moved into their traditional patterns making it easier for anglers to locate active fish.

We have been locating active fish on main lake humps and bars just about every day now.  During low light periods they are being found near the top of these structures in roughly 20' of water and making their way down to 30' as the day progresses.  Using a 4'-5' Roach Rig with a red hook has put many fish in the boat but a leech seems to be the only thing they are interested in.

Locating these fish on your electronics can be difficult with the clouds of fish fly's.  Many of the walleye are in these clouds or down in the mud gorging themselves but this doesn't seem to be slowing the bite at all.  If you see something on your electronics that doesn't look quite right there is a good chance that it's fish you are seeing.

Have a safe and happy holiday weekend!

Lots Of Sun And Minimal Wind Has Allowed Many Anglers To Enjoy A Successful Day On The Water

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com


Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 6-20-05
We have had a week of scorching weather up here in the northland. The fish have been out on their summer patterns for a few days now, with most of our fish coming in with a leech or crawler. The fish have been off the sides of the deep structure feeding off the insect and minnow larvae in the mud.
Winnie has been good bite with most fish being caught in that 26-28 ft of water with a leech and crawler, with just a medium length snell. There are still some fish in the weeds but you need alittle wind to sir them up.
Bowstring, Sand, Round, trout and Pokegama have all been pretty good bite also.some of those lakes we have been fishing the deep weed lines with a jig and minnow or a crawler. The area lakes seem to be in their prime right now and the fishing is good.
Good luck fishing - Jason Boser

Fishing Fever Guide Service - boser@grandrapidsmn.com - Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/ Mnfishingpros.com

Fishing Report 6/23/05 Jeff Sundin – Summer Heat Wave Sends Fish In New Directions.

This is about as close to the "Normal Summer" as we’ve gotten in the past several years. The rainy season came on schedule and now the hot season appears to be rolling in. Surface water temperatures have risen from the cool sixties up to the high seventy-degree range in about a week. With the warm up we’ve seen accelerated weed growth, a variety of insect hatches and re-locating fish. Moving from spot to spot and checking for "new arrivals" has been the rule of the week. The summer season is upon us.

JohnSkoglund with a great 29 inch Walleye he rooted out of the weeds

What? You don't like dabbling in the weeds? Try pulling one of these out of a big green Cabbage Bed and you'll be converted for life. In this weed bed, we could see the Walleye moving out as the boat approached. It took a lot of patience, but the rewards were great.

Walleye can still be found in the shallows, especially on windy days. But now the preferred bite is centered on main lake bars and humps. Now that the water is warming up, there are enough minnows and insects on the deeper structures to begin signaling the Walleye to make their move. We’ve been able to catch some of the deep Walleyes on Jig and Minnow, some on Night Crawlers and some on Leeches. Any day this week that I would have shown up without one of these three baits, would have been a day without a few of the fish we otherwise caught. It seems like we’ve had to change baits almost every time we moved to a new location. Each small group of fish has had it’s own preference.

Shallow water Walleye are inhabiting the deeper portions of the new green weed beds and in areas where weeds meet deeper water, rocks or gravel, there will be at least some fish holding there. When it’s calm, we’ve been able to catch some of these fish by going into the weeds and "flipping" our jigs tipped with either minnows or crawlers, into pockets. These pockets are open spaces between weed clusters that offer the fish an ambush spot to catch bait as it moves through. By concentrating on these openings, you can fish the weeds without getting snagged up. Use a vertical jigging approach and don’t worry about making long casts. Just fish far enough ahead of the boat to get to the fish before they see you coming and you’ll be able to scratch out several fish from each of the better weed beds.

Crappies, for the most part, have moved out of the shallow areas and are located in and around the deep weeds adjacent to deep open water holes. The better locations will have cabbage; coontail or other mixed weeds and should be fairly close to open water. During the day, the fish will move to the deeper portions of the weed bed or even out into the open water. At dusk, the fish are moving into the shallower edges and inner sections of the weeds. Some folks are using slip bobbers, but this is an excellent time to catch some of these fish by casting with an ultra-light. Try small Beetle Spins, 1/16-ounce feather jigs or my favorite, a 1/16-ounce jig with a 1-1/2 inch tube tail. Cast into the edges of the weeds and fish S-L-O-W-L-Y back to the boat.

Larger Northern Pike are showing up on the deeper portions of the new green wed beds, especially on the deeper lakes that have been slower to warm up. Holding toward the deeper edges, they’ve been easier to catch with a jig and minnow. In fact, the largest fish we’ve caught in the past week have all been on a jig/minnow on the deeper weed edges. With all of the sunshine, it’s been tough to get these fish to move up and take spoons or crankbaits, but they would probably cooperate on a gray day with a little rain or chop on the water to make them move. An alternative to the jig/minnow fishing would be to slow troll a large sucker or Chubb along these deeper edges.

In Alaska, fish like these wouldn't even get a mention. But, fishing jig and minnow with light line and no leader, they are plenty scrappy and loads of fun to catch.

Smallmouth Bass and Largemouth Bass that were on the beds heavy last week are beginning to scatter and move deeper right now. We fished bass in a few areas this Wednesday and found only a few in active Smallmouth remaining on beds. With the accelerated high water temperatures in the shallows, I’d expect to see Bass moving to the deep weedlines soon, if they haven’t made the move already. For daytime fishing, try a jerk worm like the popular Slug-go. Cast it out on to the shallow flat portions of the weed beds and work it back to the boat slowly using a twitch and pause motion. During this early part of summer, you’ll get some really explosive hits on these things and if you haven’t tried them before, you owe it to yourself to see how they work.

Bluegills and sunfish are still in the shallows and active this week, with lots of nice catches being reported on the smaller Bass/Panfish type lakes in the area. Shallow, mixed sand and gravel areas are where these fish spawn and you’ll locate lots of them by cruising along the shoreline and finding the nesting areas visually. Once located, presentation is simple. If you have an ultra light rod with light 2 to 4 pound test line, casting small jigs toward the shallows and retrieving slowly is the most fun. But bobbers set for shallow water will also get you in to plenty of Bluegill action right now.

Minnesota State Flower, The Lady Slipper. In bloom now in the Grand Rapids Area.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

UPNORTH Fishing Report 6-20-2005 Jason Green

Fish Fly Hatch And Sun

 Wow, it looks like summer is finally here and with this progression things are changing in the 1000 Grand Lakes Area.
  The first fish fly hatch has taken place but we have lucked out again and it was a small one.  Summer days with no to little wind, fish flies and lakes filled with bait fish slow angler's production.
  Walleye action has slowed some this past week but remarkably anglers are sticking it out and still pulling limits.  The most consistent bite seems to be working the shoreline weeds in  roughly 7'-10' of water using a jig and minnow, although a 4'-5' Snell tipped with a leech will produce during certain times of the day.  Mid lake structure are now holding good numbers of fish but on calm days they remain inactive. 
  Small Mouth are receiving the spot light with many opportunities.  This is a great time of year for smallies!  We are right on the break of seeing these fish explode and kick into high gear.  It doesn't matter how you like to fish them, pre spawn, spawn and post spawn are all happening at the same time.  Pre Spawn smallies are now staging just outside of their spawning areas.  These fish can be located suspended off sharp break lines getting ready to move in shallow any day.  Prop baits and suspending crank baits are working best.  Spawn, these fish are incredible to target!  Shallow sandy shoreline flats mixed with rock and some gravel are holding these fish.  Aggressive males are guarding the nests right now

Summer Has Finally Graced The 1000 Grand Lakes Area But Fish Are Still Transitioning Giving Many Different Opportunities For Anglers

making for an exciting day one the water.  Northland's new Weedless Jungle Jig-Loc with a sinco is working quite nicely when giving it a couple small pops and then letting it rest.  Post Spawn smallies are now starting to show up in their deep water havens.  Locating structure in deeper water adjacent to their spawning areas is a good place to start.  These fish are currently recovering and are not very active but pulling crank baits is getting a few to strike.

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com


Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 6-20-05
          Hope everybody out there had a good Fathers day. The fishing around the area has been going more and more into the summer pattern. The fish seem to be more eager to take the leeches and crawlers, and they are starting to move from the shallow flats to more of the midlake structure.
Winnie has been pretty decent. The fish are on the bars and humps and still in the weeds. Wind will really activate the weed bite and if it is calm or little wind the humps should keep you going. On the humps I have been using jig and shiner and a rig with a leech or crawler. My snells have been about 3-4 ft nothing to long yet with a colored northland #4 hook.
          Sand, Bowstring, Trout, Round and pokegama have all been do pretty decent also. On some of these smaller lakes I like using the jig and minnow even for a summer bite. I have been able to do that so far on these lakes. This time of the year the big females are starting to feed so remember to throw back them big ones.
          The bass fishing on area lakes has really started heating up, so all you bass fishermen, now is the time
Good luck fishing - Jason Boser

Fishing Fever Guide Service - boser@grandrapidsmn.com - Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/ Mnfishingpros.com

Fishing Report 6/15/05 Jeff Sundin – Walleyes Make A Move, Bluegill Action Heating Up

What’s new this week? Well in spite of rainy. Cool weather, the growing season is inching along and fish are making transitions, albeit slower than usual. Even though water temperatures are having a hard time moving out of the low to mid sixties, we are seeing evidence of insect hatches on the mid depth flats in 10 to 16 feet of water. As these insect hatches begin, so does the fish movement toward deeper water.

Walleyes can still be found in the shallows on most of the Grand Rapids area lakes, but there are increasing numbers of fish using the deeper, main lake structures. Areas that transition from the shoreline out toward main lake bars, humps and mud flats are ideal spots for locating these moving fish. Points that lead out to deep water, emerging weed beds adjacent to deep holes and small humps located near the shoreline are all holding fish, at least temporarily as they move deeper. We’re still catching plenty of Walleye on jig and minnow, but every day I experiment with crawlers and leeches and they are producing fish as well.

Baitfish schools like these are abundant in the Grand Rapids Area Lakes right now

Lookie here! Huge schools of minnow like this are common in the area right now. Note the Walleye located in the lower right of the sonar screen. When you see this, it's time to stop and fish. (For larger view, click on image).

 

With lakes filled literally to the brim with baitfish, it’s been tough to pin down any locations with large schools of fish. Instead, they are broken up into smaller groups and scattered fairly evenly around the lakes. When I locate large schools of minnows there are almost always at least some fish nearby.

Crappie anglers around the Itasca area have noted that most of the shallow spawning fish have moved out into summer cover. Cabbage or mixed Coontail weeds are now holding the fish as they head for deeper water. Like the Walleye, these fish are locating near deep water, but not necessarily out into the wide-open spaces just yet. A shoreline hole that’s located near deep weeds, brush piles or deeper gravel/rocks will still hold some fish before they start roaming open water during the daytime. Slip bobbers with small jigs are still useful, but small jigs of 1/16 ounce to 1/8 ounce tipped with a minnow or plastic tail and fished vertically in heavier cover will also produce good catches of Crappie.

Bluegills and sunfish are in the shallows and active this week, with lots of nice catches being reported on the smaller Bass/Panfish type lakes in the area. Shallow, mixed sand and gravel areas are where these fish spawn and you’ll locate lots of them by cruising along the shoreline and finding the nesting areas visually. Once located, presentation is simple. If you have an ultra light rod with light 2 to 4 pound test line, casting small jigs toward the shallows and retrieving slowly is the most fun. But bobbers set for shallow water will also get you in to plenty of Bluegill action right now.

Northern Pike are beginning to show up on the deeper structures too and it’s not been uncommon this week to catch Pike in the 14 to 22 foot depth ranges. With plenty of good green cabbage and large schools of bait building up on the deeper edges, Northern Pike are staging in these areas to feed. We’ve had better luck picking these fish up on a jig and minnow than by casting for them. We’ve been getting a lot of jigs snipped off, especially by the smaller fish. So, if you want to single out some nice Pike, I’d suggest using a foot long piece of heavy monofilament as a leader. This protects you from most of the bite-off problems, but stays flexible and requires less frequent re-ties than you’d experience with the standard steel leader.

To protect from North Pike bite-offs, use a heavy monfilament leader with your jig

Rig yourself a leader like this to protect from Northern Pike bite-offs. I use 17 pound fluorocarbon line to make the leader. It's clear, remains straight after many fish and it's very tough. Perfect for jigging those deep weedline Pike in early summer.

Smallmouth Bass and Largemouth Bass are on the beds in most lakes now and we’ve seen quite a few males guarding their nest vigorously. Shallow water sight anglers are in their element right now. Top water baits and jigs with plastic tails are both working well. Releasing fish caught in the shallows near these spawning grounds is considered mandatory by most anglers and if you’re looking for fish to eat, I’d recommend zeroing in on the panfish that are also located shallow at the moment.

Good Luck! Check Back For Updates.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

UPNORTH Fishing Report 6-13-2005 Jason Green

Summer Progression

  It seems for every one day of summer we have been receiving at least four days of wind and rain but what ever the day holds, fish continue to bite.
  Most of the larger lakes in the 1000 Grand Lakes Area have water temperatures in the mid 60's but The shoreline bite continues to do well just about everyday.  Emerging weeds in roughly 7 feet of water are holding the most fish with a jig and minnow producing best but as the day continues we have found fish in water as shallow as 3.5 feet.  When fishing in the weeds, keeping your jig as light as possible will help you work your way through with less hang ups.  For the most part Watermelon and Chartreuse are working best.
  Even with the shoreline bite still working, the past couple of days we have been marking fish out on mid lake structure such as humps and bars.  Currently it is not a hot bite but we have been able to pull a few fish while rigging with a crawler or leech.  If the current weather patterns continue this mid lake bite should heat up any day.

The Shoreline Bite Continues To Do Well But Summer Progression Is In Motion And Mid Lake Structure Such As Humps And Bars Are Holding Descent Numbers.

 

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com


Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 6-13-05

Winnie fishing is progressing rather smoothly. The fish are in the shallows in the 7.5-10ft around the weeds. You can find them at the dishes, northshore and in muskie bay. The shiners are pretty much done with their spring ritual so the walleye will start their move to the midlake humps and bars more and more. The fish are on the humps somewhat already with a few coming out of there on leeches and crawlers.
Pokegama has started letting up some nice eyes in the evening some coming in at 7-8ft of water with some real dandies. Round, Sand, and Bowstring have been steady producers of fish. One thing weird this year is how deep these fish are out on some of these lakes. A lot of fish coming in at 20+ ft of water alittle deep for this time of year.
Good luck fishing - Jason Boser

Fishing Fever Guide Service - boser@grandrapidsmn.com - Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/ Mnfishingpros.com

Fishing Report 6/9/05 Jeff Sundin – Walleye and Crappie Cooperate In Spite of Turbulent Weather.

Since my last report, we’ve had another go around with stormy weather. This season it sometimes seems like the fish actually prefer the stormy weather. We’ve had so much turbulence they have gotten used to it and after a fairly stormy week, the only really tricky bite occurred on our best weather day. On that day, we still caught enough fish to make a good trip, but it wasn’t nearly as good as it’s been during the rest of the week and not the kind of fishing folks would have been used to after the past several seasons. When the weather is rainy, windy and otherwise just plain miserable, the fish have been active and there’s been plenty of action. Just like the good old days.

Smallmouth Bass are on the beds in some lakes, but on others they’re still staging to move in. Deeper, clear lakes with cooler water have fish running the sand breaks, rock edges and near the bulrush beds. The warmer lakes have fish on top of the shallow flats keeping the beds safe from predators. Top water plugs, jig & tube combos and jerk worms are all producing some fish. If you like Smallmouth action and want it to continue, release these fish. Particularly the larger fish and any fish caught on the beds.

Crappie fishing has continued to be decent this week. We found Crappies today (Wednesday) in deeper water adjacent to familiar spawning areas. They were suspended in the deeper weed edges where Cabbage and Coontail provided some daytime cover. Fish that we’ve caught recently are clearly in full scale spawning mode and the females that have eggs remaining are completely ripe and ready to finish off the spring project. During the next week or so, the Crappies will begin to locate in these deeper weed beds. Fishing with a bobber and small jig will catch some Crappies, so will jigs fished vertically in the mixed weeds.

Northern Pike action is steady and fish of small to medium size continue to be both plentiful and willing to bite. Larger fish are also gathering along prime drop off areas where food is plentiful. Picking a lake with decent size fish is the secret, a little research into the size structure of the Pike in your area will pay off big time. Best baits at the moment are spoons and spinnerbaits. White is always a good choice for spinnerbaits, but we’ve had a bit of luck with the Orange/Black combos too. If you want to single out some of the larger Pike, stick with the larger size spoons and large single bladed spinnerbaits, The extra thump seems to help zero in on larger Northern Pike.

We’ve heard that some folks are finding Bluegills in the shallows as well. I haven’t had the opportunity to take a shot as these, but maybe we can get a better report on them this week.

Walleyes are acting like fish with plenty of food to eat and in no hurry to feed. So they’re picking and choosing their opportunities and getting active during the peak times. Prime times like sunrise and sunset, windy days and days before storms arrive have all been great times to fish. Nice days, calm and/or sunny weather have been a struggle for most folks. With huge populations of baitfish, primarily young Perch that were hatched last spring (2004) and have filled many of our area lakes to the brim, this could well be a pattern that we see re-occurring throughout the summer. Another complicating factor (for the time being) is that area lakes are all at different stages of development. Shallow lakes that warmed quickly during our April heat wave are already in summer patterns, while deeper cold lakes that didn’t warm quickly in April are still in the early spring patterns.

On calm days, anglers are finding better Walleye action by fishing "prime time" like these boats fishing the sunset.

We’ve been making sure to have Minnows, Crawlers and Leeches available on every trip. Make sure you cover all of the bases and don’t get lazy about your choice of locations and bait presentations. We’ve been changing our approach almost daily and whenever we hit on the right combination, the fish have been fairly easy to catch. Most of the Walleye action continues to be centered on the shoreline and newly emerging weed beds. For the most part, weeds have been key to locating Walleyes on most of the lakes we’ve fished. Jig and minnow still provides the best action, but rigging with Crawlers and Leeches is work for plenty of folks too. One trick I’ve noticed is that the fish want to see some movement and when we don’t have a lot of wind, we’ve been better off trolling at a quicker pace and jigging aggressively.

Plenty of eater size Walleyes are coming in this week. Turbulent weather has not slowed the action, nice days with high blue skies have been more of a struggle. Fishing the evening bite will help round out an otherwise lack-luster fishing day.

www.jeffsundin.com    jsundin@paulbunyan.net   Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 6-6-05
The weather in Northern Minnesota hasn’t changed much, wind and rain with lots of both. The good news is the fishing has changed. The Winnie bite has finally moved to the shallow water. Most our fish are coming in at that 7-9ft of water. The shiners are shallow and so are the fish. 1/8-oz Fireballs in the rainbow color and a shiner seem to work the best. The North shore and the south down in muskie have been the best bite.
Sand, Bowstring and even Jessie has had some good fishing too. Round is still putting out some fish in the shallow water. Red lake for the crappies has still been pretty decent. Crappies on cutfoot have been being caught in the channel at dusk. The fishing has picked up a bit around the northland.
Good luck fishing - Jason Boser

Fishing Fever Guide Service - boser@grandrapidsmn.com - Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/ Mnfishingpros.com

UPNORTH Fishing Report 6-5-2005 Jason Green

The Feeding Frenzy Begins

What an incredible week on the water!!  I can't remember the last time the 1000 Grand Lakes Area experienced so many phenomenal days in a row.  Not only are we pulling limits of eaters but many larger fish also.

At the beginning of the week we were graced with a couple days of summer.  Hot, Hot, Hot days with no wind which caused bait fish and walleyes to scatter but after many hours we figured out that a 6 foot Roach Rig tipped with a leech did the trick.  With fish being scattered looking for a meal they were found in water anywhere from 10' to 20' which made things a bit difficult but not impossible.  Keeping the boat moving as slow as possible with little to no rod movement got the fish biting.

After a couple days of summer Mother Nature once again said enough and sent high winds our way which kept many of the smaller boats away from where the fish were biting.  Working the wind blown shorelines again was the trick but the key to success was to locate weeds in 7'-10' of water depending on how hard the wind was blowing.  So far this year Watermelon colors have been out producing every color of the rainbow with a 1/16 oz Fireball  or ball style jig with a short shank triggering the bite.  Even when the wind is blowing dragging it like a rig with little hops is putting fish in the boat but when you can get the jig to hit bottom snap jigging is the ticket.

With water temperatures now in the low 60's my guess is that it won't be long for walleyes to start moving out into the lake and relating to humps and bars but for now stay on the bait fish, it's working.

Reports of a good solid crappie bite is in action.  Crappie are spawning so locating rocky shoreline area's should narrow your search but at this point these reports are coming from other anglers but I will be starting my crappie adventure in a couple days.

 

Got To Love It, Summer Is Finally Here!

 

Plenty Of Photo Fish This Past Week With Limits
Of Perfect Size Eaters For The Fry Pan.  A Watermelon
1/16 oz Fireball Or Ball Style Jig With A Short Shank
Tipped With A Shiner Is Keeping The Rod Bending.

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com


Fishing Report 6/2/05 Jeff Sundin – Summer Weather Arrives, Fishing Action Heats Up

With some of the turbulent spring weather behind us, summer is inching its way into the Grand Rapids Region. Warming water temperatures, Southerly breezes and feeding fish are on the horizon for the up-coming week. Water temperatures have risen to at or slightly above the 60 degree on many of the shallower lakes and temperatures remain in the high fifties in the deeper water lakes. As the temps rise, fish activity is picking up. Action is best when we get a breeze, but savvy anglers are catching some fish even during the calm times.

Winnie Walleye, released by Marlene Swang

Walleyes are considerably more scattered than what we’re used to for this time of year and even though there are some large schools of fish in a limited number of areas, it’s best to search for small schools of fish in off-beat locations. Finding fresh schools of fish is important right now because there’s fairly heavy fishing pressure on many of the more popular spots. Pressure has made fish in these areas spooky and so the bite is on and off, becoming sluggish or even coming to a stand still at times, picking up at prime times like morning, evening or when the wind blows. There are still lots of minnows in the shallows, so at least some of the better schools of Walleye remain in these areas to feed. There are also some early signs of fish moving across deeper flats and staging on their way to mid-lake structure. So folks with a bias toward deep water will be in business shortly. Although jig & minnow is still catching fish, rigging with leeches and crawlers is gaining strength and it’s a good idea to start bringing a wider variety of baits on your fishing trips.

Crappies are still in spawning areas, but it’s beginning to look like spawning is winding down in the shallower, warmer areas. We’ve caught enough Crappies this week to give me the impression that they’ll stay in the shallows for a little while longer, maybe a week or so, but I wouldn’t count on it to go much longer than that. Next step will be to locate them in mid depth Cabbage weeds, mixed Coontail and rock/gravel bars.

Best presentation is 1/8 ounce or 1/16-ounce jigs tipped with minnows. We’re still using bobbers rather than moving baits, fish are moderately active, but unlike last spring, they’re not really chasing the beetle spins or other faster moving baits just yet.

Northern Pike action is shifting from the smaller fish that devour everything in site and some larger fish are starting to show up in the better shallow feeding areas.

Bruce Champion with a nice Minnesota Northern Pike

We’ve had some luck casting spoons, but trolling is about even with casting in terms of producing fish. We strongly suggest releasing these larger fish as a way of providing some trophy opportunities for the future. Thankfully, we’ve seen some lakes in our area receive experimental Northern Pike Regulations requiring the release of fish in the 3 to 8 pound size ranges and we’re hopeful that this will result in some places to look for larger fish down the line. In the meantime, if you want to eat Pike, please learn how to remove the Y bones and start utilizing some of these smaller fish. The abundance is incredible and they’re good to eat as well as great fun for youngsters to catch.

Releasing Northern Pike in Minnesota will help improve your chances of catching a trophy

An explosive release! We're confident that this fish will provide action for another lucky angler down the road.

Good Luck! Check Back For Updates! - The Early Bird

www.jeffsundin.com     jsundin@paulbunyan.net

Copyright © Jeff Sundin 2005

 

May 2005

 


UPNORTH Fishing Report 5-28-2005 Jason Green

Rain And Wind Continue

Rain and wind continue to be the norm in the 1000 Grand Lakes Area for most of the week making it difficult for many anglers but not impossible. 

Even with the fish being mixed up from the weather they are still hungry and hitting the jig and minnow hard.  The key is to locate schools of bait fish and be able to follow them with the changing conditions.  Depending on the time of day and how hard the wind is blowing active fish are being caught anywhere from 4.5' of water all the way to 13'.

Like the previous weeks an 1/8oz watermelon Stand Up Fireball is producing well but at times a 1/16oz shines like no other.  Unfortunately the smallest size the Stand Up comes in is a 1/8oz so switching to a standard Fireball or Gum-Ball is a must.

No one presentation is working better then another so we have been mixing it up by dragging with a hop, then wiggling the tip followed by a quick snap...  Fish On!!!
 

       



Continuous Rain And Wind Are Making It Difficult For Anglers But Not Impossible.  Wind Blown Shorelines Are Filled With Bait Fish And Active Walleyes.

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com


UPNORTH Fishing Report 5-23-2005 Jason Green

Water Temperature On The Rise

High winds and rain continue through the 1000 Grand Lakes Area making it difficult for anglers but not impossible.  With water temperatures on the rise fish are becoming more active but locating them can take some time.

Keying in on wind blown shorelines are an excellent place to start.  The high winds have been pushing bait fish together in shallow water creating an all you can eat buffet for fish.  Another trick is to use your electronics to locate vegetation.  With it being so early in the season weed growth is minimal but we have been finding patches of stubble that walleyes are relating to.

Once fish are located a 1/16oz jig such as a Fireball or a Bug Eye Shorty is still working best tipped with a minnow but when the wind is blowing you will have to increase to a 1/8oz jig.  When using a 1/8oz jig better numbers are being caught with a Stand Up Fireball.

For those of you struggling and becoming frustrated we are only one week into the season with the best yet to come!     

   

Early Spring Can Be A Perfect Time To Get The Kids Excited About Jigging Walleyes.  When The Fish Are Hungry After The Spawn The Kids Can't Get Enough!
 

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com


UPNORTH Fishing Report 5/17/2005 Jason Green

Another Opener Come And Gone

     
Mother Nature Put Anglers To The Test During The MN Fishing Opener.

 

Another MN Fishing Opener has come and gone and this one seemed to be no different from the previous years.  Mother Nature tried to throw a curve ball with high winds, rain and even hale but anglers that faced the harsh surroundings managed to do surprisingly well.

Working wind blown shoreline flats has been a good place to start.  During low light periods fish are being caught in 17'-18' of water and as the day progress' they seem to be moving into the 4'-6' mark.

Chartreuse and watermelon Northland Fireballs are working well at all depths tipped with a silver shiner but the Stand Up version of the Fireball is  working even better.  Water temps are at roughly 17 degrees so a slow presentation with little movement is needed, the slower the better.

 The trick is to hold the boat as still as possible with the jig resting on the bottom.  Once the fish grabs the bait wiggle the tip slightly which will force the walleye to either let go or get a better hold.  Once it grabs it set the hook.  Also during these cold temps the smaller your presentation the better.  If conditions will allow a 1/16 oz jig is perfect but with the high winds the past three days we found a 1/8 oz was easier to stick to the bottom.

        

A Few Slot Fish, A Box Full Of Eaters And A Few Jumbos Made For A Great Weekend.

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com


Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 5-16-05
Another opener came and went and another cold year. Wow was that rain and wind nasty this opener. The one good thing I have been hearing that the fish were cooperating fairly decent around the area. I was on Cass Lake and the water temp was 49 degrees about 5 degrees warmer than it has been the last few years. The fish were a bit deeper in the 15-16 ft range. We just kept working the West End (by Allen’s Bay) till we would find a school and they would bite pretty well. We were using 1/8-oz fireballs the firetiger and trolling slow or drifting. If you weren’t going slow you didn’t get fish.
I have heard that Winnie did well over the weekend with a lot of nice fish being brought in. Mostly I have heard the deeper water 12-14 ft on Winnie. The baitfish are piled on that drop and the fish seem to be smacking pretty well.
That is all the info I have. Get out there fishing and have a great day.

Jason Boser Fishing Fever Guide Service
boser@grandrapidsmn.com
Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/
Mnfishingpros.com


Click Here For 2005 Season Opener Outlook


Fishing Report 5/15/05 Jeff Sundin – The Minnesota Walleye Opener

Continuing the recent tradition of fishing in the cold, snow, wind and rain, The 2005 Minnesota Walleye Opener arrived with a little bit of all the nastiness Minnesota weather can dish out. Most folks never have to endure fishing on days like we had this opener, so I have to give a lot of them credit for toughing it out. Even with high winds and cold temps there were lots of people on the water up here this weekend and for lots of them, the struggle against the weather did not go un-rewarded.

We fished mainly along the first steep drop off edge at about nine feet of water and discovered early in the day, that the fish were relating to schools of minnows that were holding along these deeper pockets waiting to return to the shallows on a warmer day. We tried a few areas that normally hold fish on opener, but where baitfish were not present, neither were the Walleye. This tells me that the fish have nearly full recovered from the spawning season and are back to actively feeding on the minnows as they spawn in shallow water. Depending on how long the cold weather persists, this could be the signal of an earlier move to deeper water this season.

Our best fishing strategy was to use a 1/16 oz Sneaky Pete with a larger than normal Rainbow Chubb. We hooked the minnows lightly in the lips and fished them using a wiggling or wagging motion on the rod tip. Shiners worked too, but it was clear that the fish preferred the Rainbows on this outing. Heavy weights and fast jigging was not the ticket and we noticed that during wind gusts or when the boat moved too fast, our bite would virtually stop. Whenever we could go slow and maintain control of these little jigs, we would get back into the action. We finished up a bit earlier than usual this year because of the chilly weather, but not before collecting a nice mess of eating size Walleye.

Looking out the window now, it appears that we’re in for more of the same treatment today and I’ll try to post an update this evening.

Good Luck! Check Back For Updates!

TheEarlyBird-Jeff Sundin

www.jeffsundin.com

jsundin@paulbunyan.net

Copyright ă Jeff Sundin 2005


Grand Rapids Winnie fishing report 5-5-05

We are finally here another opener, right around the corner. We all have been waiting for this along time. I was on red yesterday we did ok it was a lot of work to get the crappies I don’t think they are in full force quite yet. The Walleyes were nuts though and we had a great time. I will be writing my weekly reports again hopefully every mon. or tues. I will be opening at cass lake like I have for many years with my family and with the warmer weather this year it should be a banner one. I look forward to some good fishing up around our area also. Winnie, Sand, Bowstring, Splithand Pokie should all be good this year. I hope Jessie picks up a bit more consistently I think it will. Stick with a 1/8-oz leadhead jig and a good shiner and you should be able to find some fish.

Good luck on this opener to all and be safe. - Jason Boser - Fishing Fever Guide Service
boser@grandrapidsmn.com
Fishingminnesota.com/fishingfever/
Mnfishingpros.com


UPNORTH Fishing Report 5/6/2005 Jason Green

It's The Final Count Down

That's right, we are just 1-week away from one of Minnesota's greatest traditions, Fishing Opener.  A time for friends and family to get together and share stories of what has been happening the past several months or take a more competitive angle and find out who had the bigger fish that got away last season.

One week might seem like a lifetime to some but before you know it your boat will be pounding the waves and a few fresh fillets will grace the fry pan again.  With limited time till you hit the water where is one to start preparing?

Think back to the 2004 Opener and remember how many boats/trailers you saw stranded on the side of the road?  Checking your tires air pressure, grease the bearings and make sure the tires are not wearing unevenly will aid in a safe trip to the lake.

Have you had your boat on the water yet?  Take a short trip on a local lake and run the motor at different RPM's to make sure you burn all the fogging oil out of the cylinders and that it is running smoothly.  Are all your batteries holding a full charge?  Your trip could end up short if they are not replaced.

I would have to say the next most important thing to check is the line on your reels.  Fishing Line will start to break down over time and become brittle.  Nothing is worse then hooking into your lunch and have the line break.

 Reports of Crappie staging near spawning areas have been coming in.  If the warm weather continues they should start moving into the shallows which can make for an incredible bite.

The Cut Foot Walleye Spawning Station set another record earlier this spring.  Over a six day period DNR workers stripped 1400 quarts of Walleye eggs with the majority stripped in two days.  2.5-3 quarts of eggs will then be placed into a hatching jar with one quart equaling an estimated 120,000 eggs.  At the hatchery water temperature will be adjusted as the eggs develop.  After about 17 days the eggs will begin to hatch.  These fry are very small and are similar in size to a mosquito.  There is roughly 100,000 fry to equal a pound.  These fry are then moved to lakes or ponds to continue their development.

As for my outlook for the 2005 opener anything can happen at this point.  Walleye should start moving from the spawning areas back out into the lakes any day now depending on Mother Nature.  If she is kind to us this week watch the shallows closely.  When the shallows start to warm a thermo cline will appear creating excessive oxygen that will drive the fish crazy.  Local Bait Shops are reporting that the nets are beginning to fill with shiners so cross your fingers, anything can happen!

 

Have a safe and fun Minnesota Fishing Opener!

See You On The Water!  (218) 327-8183 jason@upnorthinc.com - www.upnorthinc.com

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